Fried chicken, grain bowls and crazy mash-ups ruled 2015, but it's time to make room for some new food trends come 2016.

From healthy options to more unknown delicacies, the new year's foodscape promises plenty of deliciousness.

Here's what we predict will dominate your plate in 2016.

Alternative pastas

International food consulting agency Baum + Whiteman reports
International food consulting agency Baum + Whiteman reports that in the last five years, pasta sales have fallen 6% in the U.S., 8% in Australia, 13% in Europe and 25% in Italy! That's a whole lot of meatballs without spaghetti. Instead, expect to see more veggie spiralized pastas, spaghetti squash and even alternative-grain pastas as found at Bushwick's Faro, where the chef mills locally-sourced grains in house. (Credit: Michael Tulipan )

Vegan dining

We're not predicting more people will go totally
We're not predicting more people will go totally meat- and dairy-free in 2016, but more will opt for vegan meals, thanks to greater availability of delicious and healthy vegan fare, as well as a concern for the environment. By Chloe was one of 2015's most celebrated restaurants in NYC (shiitake bacon! sweet potato cashew mac and cheese!) and plans to open more restaurants in the new year. (Credit: By Chloe )

Udon

There's plenty of great ramen in NYC and
There's plenty of great ramen in NYC and we don't expect that to stop any time soon, but it's time for another Japanese noodle soup to hit the spotlight. From the East Village's super-secret Raku to the thick homemade noodles at Williamsburg's Samurai Mama to the quick and tasty M2M styrofoam bowl udon, we expect slurping to get a lot thicker for 2016. (Credit: Garrett Ziegler via Flickr )

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE

New-Jew cuisine

The dishes from the old country are new
The dishes from the old country are new again! Downtown restaurants like Russ & Daughters Cafe and Kitty's-a-Go-Go have started redefining Jewish cuisine -- think matzo meal fried chicken with pastrami gravy -- and the trend is predicted to keep growing! (Credit: Kitty's Canteen )

Eating local year-round

A desire for the local has grown, born
A desire for the local has grown, born out of food lovers' concerns about what's in their food and where it comes from. Between online farmers markets like OurHarvest.com, local CSAs and frozen Hudson Valley Harvest produce available with just a click, it's easier than ever to support and enjoy local agriculture. (Credit: Hudson Valley Harvest )

Normcore dining

It's back to basics for 2016, and it's
It's back to basics for 2016, and it's no surprise when all of Instagram is so proud to be #basic. New York Magazine published an ode to "The Nostalgic Comfort of Normcore Dining" in its December "Reasons to Love New York" issue and along with Birkenstocks and plain tees, we're expecting to see a lot more basic bites on 2016 menus. (Think comfort food and grocery store ingredients, as seen on Christina Tosi's Milk Bar menus.) After all the Cronut craziness and ensuing mash-ups, we're all just ready to go back to basics. (Credit: commpilot23 via Flickr )

Outer borough dining

We know all your friends already moved to
We know all your friends already moved to Queens, so why not eat there, too? As New Yorkers branch out of Manhattan, destination dining is becoming as popular as waiting in line two hours for brunch at your neighborhood spot -- why not spend that time on the train and try something new! Ethnic neighborhoods, up-and-coming areas and just those far-out classic Brooklyn destinations you've always wanted to try are easier to reach with car and bike share programs or a willingness to let your appetite grow while on public transit. Follow The New York Times' "Hungry City" column for guidance, or choose a neighborhood and let the scents and menus guide you: You're pretty much the new Anthony Bourdain! (Credit: garysoup via Flickr )

Less common animal parts and proteins

What's scarier: GMO-salmon and pesticide-covered greens or organic,
What's scarier: GMO-salmon and pesticide-covered greens or organic, pasture-raised tripe? As diners become more conscious of what's in their food and where it's coming from, we expect a bigger surge in toe to tail dining. With meat farming constantly being sited being a top cause of greenhouse gases and climate change, sustainability also comes into play with a growing desire to eat all parts of all edible animals. 2016 may just be the year of tasty intestines! Consider ordering the wings with fried tripe on your next visit to Mission Chinese Food or the pictured intestines with peppers at Cheng Du Tian Fu in Flushing's Chinatown. (Credit: wwny via Flickr )

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE

Pop-ups

With rents rising and rising, many restaurants have
With rents rising and rising, many restaurants have had no choice but to close up shop in 2015. Both established chefs (Dan Barber, David Santos) and newcomers to the New York City restaurant scene (see: Ramen Lab's chef incubator program) have launched pop-up restaurants in already existing city kitchens to test menus and offer a temporary dining experience that may or may not ever become permanent. With the sharing economy becoming ever-prominent in NYC, we expect pop-ups to dominate the new dining landscape in 2016. (Credit: Melissa Kravitz )

Apps, apps, apps

And we're not talking appetizers! Want liquor delivered
And we're not talking appetizers! Want liquor delivered last-minute? There's an app for that. Want someone else to decide what you're having for lunch and bring it straight to your office? There's an app for that too. Everywhere from upscale restaurants on Caviar to neighborhood eateries on UberEats to major fast food chains like McDonald's and Chipotle with Postmates got into the app and delivery game this year. You can even order Starbucks on your app without leaving your desk. For coders and chefs alike, 2016 is rife with opportunity and we can't wait to see what we'll be downloading and dining on. (Credit: Maple )