Traveling to Paris for the real deal is an experience unto itself.

But New Yorkers looking for classic French cuisine — without hopping on a plane — are very lucky.

From Bouley to Balthazar, Le Bernardin to Jean-Georges, the city is not lacking in renowned bistros and fine-dining destinations.

There are even more offerings to try: Here are four new restaurants to know for French fare.

Boucherie

The folks behind Dominique Bistro opened this massive,
The folks behind Dominique Bistro opened this massive, 320-seat French brasserie nearby in the West Village last month. The kitchen is helmed by Jerome Dihui, who was chef de cuisine at Keith McNally's shuttered French bistro Pastis. The meat-focused menu includes a 36 oz. dry-aged tomahawk rib-eye for two ($135), duck confit with truffle potatoes ($31) and boudin noir ($21) -- blood sausage served with a potato puree and caramelized apples. Non-meat-eaters will also find plenty of seafood, from Normandy-style mussels ($19) to seared halibut ($34). Crème brûlée, profiteroles and chocolate mousse are among the dessert offerings. To drink, try an absinthe-based cocktail from Anthony Bohlinger (Maison Premiere, Seamstress). (99 Seventh Ave. S., Manhattan, 212-873-1616, boucherie.nyc) (Credit: Brent Herrig Photography)

Augustine

Keith McNally has brought another French bistro in
Keith McNally has brought another French bistro in NYC. The celebrated restaurateur behind Cherche Midi, Balthazar and Minetta Tavern opened his much-anticipated French restaurant in the Financial District's Beekman Hotel in November. Chefs Shane McBride and Daniel Parilla are behind the menu of modern French dishes, with classics such as cheese soufflé ($19), duck l'orange ($33) and filet mignon au poivre ($49). The extensive wine menu is rich in Champagne, if you have something to celebrate. (5 Beekman St., Manhattan, 212-375-0010, augustineny.com) (Credit: Augustine)

Le Coq Rico

This modern French restaurant is all about the
This modern French restaurant is all about the bird. Michelin-starred chef Antoine Westermann brought his gourmet Paris bistro to New York this past spring, with a menu that celebrates poultry. The dishes are primarily served family-style, with whole birds that feed up to four ($98-$100), as well as foies and terrines, soups and "eggz." If you're not looking to go the whole-bird route, a $38 lunch prix fixe is ideal, and plats du jour like a poultry burger are available for lunch and early dinner on weekdays. (30 E. 20th St., Manhattan, 212-267-7426, lecoqriconyc.com) (Credit: Asia Coladner)

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Le Coucou

Stephen Starr's French brasserie won instant praise since
Stephen Starr's French brasserie won instant praise since opening inside the 11 Howard Hotel in SoHo over the summer. The menu is from chef Daniel Rose, of the acclaimed Paris restaurants Spring and La Bourse et La Vie, and focuses on classic French cuisine. Standout dishes include the rabbit ($41), pike quenelle with lobster sauce ($33) and sweetbreads ($27). Dine in vintage chairs or blue-grey banquettes under the restaurant's multiple chandeliers. (138 Lafayette St., 212-271-4252, lecoucou.com) (Credit: Corry Arnold)