A new, month-long exhibition at the Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration explores the immigrant roots of one of the nation’s favorite foods.

Seven billion hot dogs, or 818 dogs a second — that’s how many Americans consume during peak grilling season, from Memorial Day to Labor Day, according to the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council.

“Hot Out of the Melting Pot: A History of the Hot Dog in America” showcases the immigrant origin stories of five hot dog companies, including three with New York City roots: Sabrett, Hebrew National and Nathan’s Famous.

Visitors can also order all the hot dogs they read about at the Ellis Island Cafe.

Organized by the National Park Service and Evelyn Hill, a company providing visitor services at the Statue of Liberty since 1931, the free exhibit just outside the cafe runs throughout July. First boats heading to the island leave the mainland at 8:30 a.m. and the museum closes at 6:30 p.m.

Here are some of the historical images on display, to whet your appetite:

A Sabrett's hot dog stand in 1930s New York City

Sabrett's founders, who all immigrated to America through

Sabrett's founders, who all immigrated to America through Ellis Island, launched their business on the Lower East Side in 1926. The Sabre Meat Co., as it was originally called, was a multicultural operation: one owner hailed from Russia, a second from Germany and the third from Greece.

Today, you'll see stainless steel pushcarts shaded by blue and yellow Sabrett umbrellas at most busy Manhattan street corners, and you can buy a Sabrett frank at many of the city's stadiums and arenas.

(Credit: Sabrett)

The neighborhood where Hebrew National established its first factory

Its streets perpetually crowded with pedestrians and vendors,

Its streets perpetually crowded with pedestrians and vendors, the Lower East Side was where Russian immigrant Theodore Krainin founded the Hebrew National Kosher Sausage Factory Inc. in 1905. Krainin's first factory, a six-floor walk-up, was quite the schlep.

Customers know Hebrew National best for the catchy slogan it first rolled out in 1965: "We Answer to a Higher Authority." (Credit: Library of Congress)

Nathan's Famous original stand in Coney Island

Nathan Handwerker, the man holding the toddler in

Nathan Handwerker, the man holding the toddler in the photo above, opened the original Nathan's Famous hot dog stand in 1916, four years after he immigrated to America from Poland via Ellis Island.

Nathan's launched its infamous Fourth of July hot dog-eating contest in 1972, when Brooklyn college student Jason Schechter clinched a win by scarfing down 14 hot dogs and buns.

(Credit: Nathan's Famous)

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The original snack bar serving hot dogs on Liberty Island

World War I veteran Aaron Hill opened Liberty

World War I veteran Aaron Hill opened Liberty Island's first snack bar, serving Statue of Liberty visitors root beer, orange Crush soda and 10-cent hot dogs, in the 1930s. Management passed to his Polish-born wife, Evelyn Hill, in 1943, then his son James in 1949.

These days, the third generation, family business bears Evelyn's full name and runs cafes and gift shops on both Liberty and Ellis Islands.

(Credit: Evelyn Hill)