Grab your chopsticks.

NYC is on a noodle kick, with spots for ramen, soba and more popping up in recent months.

Here are new Asian restaurants to know that are serving up traditional cuisine or fusion fare by the bowlful.

Momosan Ramen

Acclaimed chef Masaharu Morimoto (of
Acclaimed chef Masaharu Morimoto (of "Iron Chef" fame) opened his first ramen restaurant in April. The elevated Japanese menu features such noodle dishes as the pork-based tonkotsu ($10-$13), the spicy tantan with coconut curry ($10-$13) and tsukemen, pictured -- ramen dipped in a separate bowl of soup ($14). The ramen was specially made for the chef by Sun Noodles and is a hand-massaged noodle that resists becoming soggy in the broth. Beyond ramen, appetizers include pork belly bao ($4/each) and sticky ribs ($7/two). 342 Lexington Ave., 646-201-9273, momosanramen.com (Credit: Evan Sung )

Chinese Club

Chinese meets Indian cuisine at this Williamsburg restaurant
Chinese meets Indian cuisine at this Williamsburg restaurant from the husband-and-wife team of Salil Mehta and Stacey Lo, behind the Union Square Malaysian spot Laut. Chinese Club opened in their other Malaysian spot, Pasar Malam, this past spring and is modeled after Lo's great-grandfather's own Chinese Club in Darjeeling, India. The spicy menu is also inspired by her Hakka-Chinese and Indian-Chinese household, resulting in such dishes as tandoori kung bao chicken ($10.95). There are nearly a dozen noodle offerings, too, from Darjeeling Hakka lo mein, pictured, to Calcutta chili garlic egg noodles (both $9.95). 208 Grand St., Williamsburg, 718-487-4576, thechineseclubnyc.com (Credit: Chinese Club)

Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu's Kitchen

The month-old Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam
The month-old Hao Noodle and Tea by Madam Zhu's Kitchen is the first overseas location for the growing Chinese chain, which has six locations across China and two more on the way there. With food this good, it wouldn't be surprising if this is the first of many over here, too. There's a long menu (complete with pictures!) to help you navigate the offerings. Among the noodles, a must are the dan dan ($8). The homemade noodles are slick with chili oil -- leaving a little heat on your tongue and lips. Don't miss the sweet and sour Shanghai ribs ($12) or the clay pot dumplings ($12) either, and leave room for some dim sum. 401 Sixth Ave., 212-633-8900, Facebook.com/MadamZhusKitchenNYC (Credit: Ariel Kanter )

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE

Hey Hey Canteen

The team behind Park Slope favorite 2 Duck
The team behind Park Slope favorite 2 Duck Goose revamped their corner Cantonese restaurant into this casual noodle destination, which opened last month. The generous noodle dishes include sesame peanut noodles and spicy matcha soba, pictured ($9.99) -- both of which can be prepared cold, a bonus during summer months -- as well as roast pork lo mein with ramen noodles ($12.99). Sub in rice or zucchini noodles to go gluten-free. 400 Fourth Ave., Park Slope, 347-987-3830, heyheycanteen.com (Credit: Hey Hey Canteen )

ROKC

The R in ROKC stands for ramen, so
The R in ROKC stands for ramen, so that should tell you something. A few veterans of the Japanese bar Angel's Share soft-opened the new Hamilton Heights spot in April and had its grand opening last week. There are three bowls of ramen on the small food menu, all for $13: the fish-based Tokyo, pictured, the chicken-and-fish based Kyoto and the chicken-based Sapporo. Add-ons include bamboo shoot and the house-blend hot spices. The rest of the name stands for oysters, kitchen and cocktails, so you can also dabble from the raw bar, steamed buns and the new drinks menu. 3452 Broadway (Credit: ROKC via Instagram)