Naan, anyone?

Fans of chutney, curry and chaat may have noticed a rise in notable Indian options in the city as of late. The cuisine has been in the spotlight thanks to new restaurants from big-name chefs, spinoffs from existing favorites and critical darlings that have earned heaps of praise.

This may just be the year of Indian cuisine in NYC. Here are the restaurants to know.

Tapestry

Indian chef Suvir Saran left an impression on

Indian chef Suvir Saran left an impression on New York at the now-closed Indian restaurant Devi. He's back in the city as chef and co-owner of Tapestry, which opened in May with a global-inspired menu with Indian flavor (think tamarind chicken wings and foie gras with kumquat). (Pictured: masala fried chicken.) 60 Greenwich Ave., 212-373-8900, tapestryrestaurant.com

(Credit: Sal D’Alia)

Chaiwali

This restaurant is known as much for its
This restaurant is known as much for its food as its interesting backstory -- chef Anita Trehan converted the first two stories of her Harlem brownstone into the teahouse and restaurant. The menu is inspired by the home-cooked meals Trehan grew up eating, with a global flair. For instance, the black pepper chicken is served with red quinoa instead of rice. Closed Mondays; 274 Lenox Ave., 646-688-5414, chaiwali.com (Credit: Chaiwali)

Indian Accent

A New Delhi star came to New York
A New Delhi star came to New York when the team behind Indian Accent opened a New York outpost of the restaurant earlier this year at Le Parker Meridien. The original chef, Manish Mehrotra, is at the helm here, too, bringing his inventive take on traditional Indian cuisine to the city, including the restaurant's trademark kulchas stuffed with such fillings as butter chicken, saag paneer and -- in a special nod to New York -- pastrami. (Pictured: paper roast dosa.) 123 W. 56th St., 212-842-8070, indianaccent.com (Credit: Christopher Villano)

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Pondicheri

Anita Jaisinghani earned a James Bead Award nomination
Anita Jaisinghani earned a James Bead Award nomination for her upscale Indian restaurant, Indika, in Houston. Last month, she opened a New York outpost of her more casual Indian spot there, Pondicheri. The breakfast and lunch menus feature Indian street food-inspired fare, such as frankies (Mumbai-style stuffed roti and egg-washed wraps) and samosas, plus muffins and kolaches to go from the bakery. Dinner starts launches Aug. 22 and will offer shareable plates and thalis (sampler platters) that pull from across India. 15 W. 27th St., 646-878-4375 (Credit: Pondicheri)

Paowalla

Floyd Cardoz, formerly of Danny Meyer's acclaimed Indian
Floyd Cardoz, formerly of Danny Meyer's acclaimed Indian restaurant Tabla, is back with this month-old SoHo eatery, which is particularly interested in bread (the name "paowalla" translates essentially to "a person employed at or concerned with bread"). The restaurant makes use of two tandoor ovens, as well as a wood-burning oven left over from the previous tenants to make Goan breads. Beyond rosemary, garlic and bacon naans, whole wheat roti and cheddar cheese kulcha, the menu features shareable plates such as a Hyderabadi goat roast and pork ribs vindaloo. It's just open for dinner now, with brunch and lunch slated to follow. Closed Sundays; 195 Spring St., 212-235-1098, paowalla.com (Credit: Paowalla)

Graffiti Earth

Indian native and chef Jehangir Mehta debuted a
Indian native and chef Jehangir Mehta debuted a sister spot to his first restaurant, Graffiti Food & Wine Bar, this spring when Graffiti Earth opened inside the Duane Street Hotel (formerly home to his Asian fusion spot Mehtaphor). The menu features flavors and ingredients from India and beyond, with an emphasis on sustainability and reducing food waste. Dishes include braised pork buns with apricot chutney, a scallop brulee with cauliflower wasabi yogurt and curry rice eggplant sushi. Closed Sundays and Mondays; 190 Church St., 212-542-9440, graffitiearthny.com (Credit: Duane Street Hotel)

Babu Ji

Since opening last summer, this casual, dinner-only spot
Since opening last summer, this casual, dinner-only spot (there's a self-serve beer fridge), has won praise and buzz for chef Jessi Singh's elevated takes on Indian classics, from street food apps to various shareable curry and tandoori dishes. And since reservations are only accepted for the chef's table menu, there tend to be waits. 175 Ave. B, 212-951-1082, babujinyc.com (Credit: Babu Ji)

Desi Galli

Curry Hill destination Desi Galli expanded to the
Curry Hill destination Desi Galli expanded to the East Village this spring, with a second location offering owners PriaVanda and Vishal Chouhan's Indian street food, including gluten-free kathi rolls and an Indian take on poutine, with fries, tikka sauce and grated paneer. This likely isn't the last Desi Galli, either; eventually the pair looks to have four locations in NYC. 172 Ave. B, 212-475-3374, desi-galli.com (Credit: Desi Galli)

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Lala Sahab

Chef Lala Sharma rebooted his former Savoury space
Chef Lala Sharma rebooted his former Savoury space for a smaller menu that focuses more on modern Indian cuisine. Lala Sahab is slated to open Aug. 17 with new offerings such as chicken tikka sliders (pictured), dahi batata poori and tikka-wale samosa. 489 Columbus Ave., 212-875-1400 (Credit: Lala Sahab)

Royal Munkey

The team behind The Drunkey Munkey pays homage
The team behind The Drunkey Munkey pays homage to "Old Bombay" with this sister spot, inspired by the bistros and supper clubs of colonial India. Servers sport traditional outfits from India, while the Anglo-Indian menu features such dishes as a railway chicken curry -- inspired by the railway lines of the mid-1800s -- and Goan pork vindaloo, as well as bar-friendly chili cheese toast. 438 Second Ave., 646-863-2249 (Credit: Royal Munkey)

Soho Tiffin Junction

This two-year-old fast-casual Indian eatery is getting attention
This two-year-old fast-casual Indian eatery is getting attention thanks to a unique collaboration. Last year, owner Jawahar Chirimar teamed up with acclaimed modernist chef Wylie Dufresne (behind the cutting-edge wd~50) to reboot the menu. One of the results of that marriage is the popular curry burgers (pictured), which launched in June and are available with paneer, salmon, veggie and chicken patties. Other highlights include the Indian fried chicken tenders marinated in curry spices and served with spicy and mango chutneys and the cheese dosa with melted gruyere. 42 E. Eighth St., 917-514-8409, sohotiffin.com (Credit: Soho Tiffin Junction)

Chinese Club

Chinese may be in the name, but this
Chinese may be in the name, but this Brooklyn spot, which opened this past spring, also draws on Indian cuisine. Husband-and-wife Salil Mehta and Stacey Lo modeled their new restaurant after Lo's great-grandfather's own Chinese Club in Darjeeling, India. The spicy menu is also inspired by her Hakka-Chinese and Indian-Chinese household, resulting in such dishes as tandoori kung bao chicken and Darjeeling Hakka lo mein (pictured). 208 Grand St., Williamsburg, 718-487-4576, thechineseclubnyc.com (Credit: Chinese Club)