Cones aren't just for ice cream anymore.

You may remember the failed K! Pizza Cone, which served freshly baked pizzas in an edible crust cone in Koreatown circa 2010. Well, this is nothing like that.

Spaghetti Incident (231 Eldridge St.), a new 35-seat Italian eatery from the chef behind the West Village's acclaimed Malatesta (649 Washington St.) and Malaparte (753 Washington St.), Emanuele Attala, has created a new way to eat your noodles: in a cone.

Although not edible -- we'd really like to see a garlic bread cone--, the drip-proof cone inspired by Italian street food is perhaps the perfect vessel from which to swirl your spaghetti, shove pesto-coated bucatini into your mouth or just slurp up all the carbonara you desire.

"It only works with long pasta," Chef Attala explained. For a pasta cone to be successful, it's all about geometry.

A tubular penne pasta could become dangerously stuck at the bottom of the cone, whereas a swirl of spaghetti puttanesca offers an extra sip of saucey anchovies and capers from the cup-like cone.

You can twist the fork in your hand or the cone itself to transport the long noodles from cone to mouth.

The spaghetti cone can be enjoyed while sitting, standing or walking. While many Italians wouldn't be caught coffee-handed with a disposable espresso cup, New Yorkers pretty much rely on eats on the go.

Previously, there was no great way to enjoy dishes like spaghetti in ragu bolognese while rushing to the F train, but Spaghetti Incident has pioneered the effort for busy pasta lovers.

Spaghetti Incident offers a cash-only menu of nine pastas priced $8-12, as well as a daily special. Salads and arancini are also avialable dine-in or to-go.