The Irish pub brings to mind overflowing pints of Guinness beer and perhaps some questionable shamrock-infused decorating choices. Don’t get us wrong, that does have its charm, but New York’s Irish food scene has much more to offer.

From traditional bar menus and draft beer watering holes, to elevated modern cuisine, all five boroughs put some plates on the table when it comes to Gaelic hospitality. Head to Molly’s Shebeen for über traditional bites, out to Hartley’s in Brooklyn for locally sourced fare, or up to An Beal Bocht Cafe for a taste of Irish music and art.

Whatever your scene might be, these spots will have you feeling lucky.

Gastropub it up at The Dog and Duck

It's true -- Sunnyside, Queens has a gastropub.
It's true -- Sunnyside, Queens has a gastropub. At The Dog and Duck, stop in for typical plates (mussels and fries, roast chicken) or Irish-inspired pub food (stuffed burger, crispy fish and chips). Craft beers run the gamut from local to European (there's even an Irish cider). (The Dog and Duck, 45-20 Skillman Ave., Queens, 718-406-9048, thedogandduckny.com) (Credit: The Dog and Duck)

Super traditional at Molly’s Shebeen

Sawdust-covered wooden floors, a fireplace and brick walls
Sawdust-covered wooden floors, a fireplace and brick walls exude a no-frills vibe at this Gramercy Park pub. Opened in 1960, Molly's Shebeen dates back to 1895 when it started out as a grocery. Epicurean purists will delight in menu options like Irish lamb stew and corned beef and cabbage. And no question about it, a pint of Guinness is in order here. (Molly's Shebeen, 287 Third Ave., 212-889-3361, mollyshebeen.com) (Credit: NYCRestaurant.com)

Uptown Gaelic goodness at Le Cheile

Find yourself uptown just under the George Washington
Find yourself uptown just under the George Washington Bridge for a feeling of togetherness. The name of this Irish outpost comes from untranslatable Gaelic, roughly meaning "together." The Washington Heights area was once home to a large Irish community, the remnants of which are still alive and well at Le Cheile. Daily specials pile high and weekday happy hour keeps locals returning. (Le Cheile, 839 W. 181 St., 212-740-3111, lecheilenyc.com) (Credit: Le Cheile)

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Lillie’s offers Victorian ambience

Ever wanted to know what it's like to
Ever wanted to know what it's like to step off of bustling Manhattan streets and into a bit of Victorian respite? Lillie's has that covered. Named for Lillie Langtry, a late British actress and socialite of the 19th century, much of the décor comes from an Irish Victorian mansion. Stop in for $17 brunch complete with a drink or unwind with a nighttime bar menu and rotating seasonal cocktails. (Lillie's, 13 E. 17 St., 212-337-1970, lilliesnyc.com) (Credit: Lillie’s)

Tír Na Nóg keeps midtown fed

Tír Na Nóg is a traditional Irish bar
Tír Na Nóg is a traditional Irish bar with a New American-focused menu and two midtown locations. Part watering hole for nearby train and tourist crowds, Tír Na Nóg manages to maintain its roots in Irish hospitality. Traditional offerings like shepherd's pie share space with lightly sautéed Bronzino. Don't forget to check out what's on tap. (Tír Na Nóg, various locations, tirnanognyc.com) (Credit: Tír Na Nóg)

Brooklyn-made at Hartley’s

At the forefront of Clinton Hill's food scene
At the forefront of Clinton Hill's food scene renaissance is a homey Irish café. The locally sourced menu is small and focused. Fare includes small bites (like local radishes with Irish butter), heartier entrees (like the house-cured beef with cheddar), and satisfying sides (like red cabbage salad in yogurt dressing). The wine list is thoughtfully curated, too. Stop in for live Irish music every Monday night at 8:30. (Hartley's, 14 Putnam Ave., 347-799-2877, hartleysnyc.com) (Credit: Hartley's)

Buzzworthy cocktails at Dead Rabbit

Tuck yourself into this downtown hideaway -- literally.
Tuck yourself into this downtown hideaway -- literally. Dead Rabbit is a cozy space nestled onto a small street just steps from the water. Founded by two Irishmen who wanted to mix the time-tested Irish pub with contemporary charm, Dead Rabbit has received much buzz for its innovative cocktail offerings. Peruse the award-winning drinks list and order a plate of fish and chips, complete with mushy peas. (Dead Rabbit, 30 Water St., Manhattan, 646-422-7906, deadrabbitnyc.com) (Credit: Dead Rabbit)

Step into a monastery at The Wicked Monk

Why not take a ride on the R
Why not take a ride on the R train for a visit to a quintessential New York Irish bar? The Wicked Monk, in Bay Ridge, is adorned with over-the-top monastery themed décor. The original wood and stained glass were shipped all the way from a former monastery in Cork. A substantial mac-and-cheese menu is a nod to the neighborhood, but the bangers and mash (pictured) and Guinness-braised short ribs are not to be missed. (The Wicked Monk, 9510 Third Ave., 347-497-5152, wickedmonk.com) (Credit: The Wicked Monk)

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Simple and easy at Joyce’s Tavern

Staten Island may be known for its pizza
Staten Island may be known for its pizza and pasta offerings, but there is something Irish in the mix. Joyce's Tavern, located in the Eltingville neighborhood, is a local institution and for good reason. This is the kind of place where you pull up a seat, order one of the many draft beers, and nosh on something from the bar menu. Just don't pass up the chance to have Joyce's signature Irish coffee as you wrap things up. (Joyce's Tavern, 3823 Richmond Ave., Staten Island, 718-948-0220, joycestavern.com) (Credit: Joyce’s Tavern)