Like a childhood bedroom seen through an adult’s eyes, a hometown or neighborhood can seem so small. Even as nostalgia blows through those street corners and parks into settings for widescreen memories, the reality can look tiny after both time and distance allow for unemotional consideration.

On March 9, 1997, Christopher Wallace was shot and killed on the Miracle Mile, a stretch of Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles, almost 3,000 miles away from the border of his home in Bedford-Stuyvesant. And while the man known to the world as the Notorious B.I.G. toured the world during his too-short life, many of the haunts of his youth (and occasionally his grownup years – after recovering from an auto accident in 1996, the first restaurant he went to was Country House Diner in Clinton Hill, according to MTV) are clustered within a small radius of the Clinton-Washington Avenue subway stop.

amNewYork took the A train to look for the ghost of one of music’s all-time greats, on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of his passing, and found a world much smaller geographically than one might expect.

George Westinghouse high school

Biggie Smalls may have been
Biggie Smalls may have been "considered a fool 'cause I dropped out of high school," but he is one of a cluster of rappers who spent time at George Westinghouse Career and Technical Education High School. Located at 105 Tech Place, it's less than two miles from the rest of Wallace's day-to-day life. Busta Rhymes, Jay-Z and DMX all roamed its halls at one time or another. The 9-12 graders here today study information technology, electrical installation and practice, or culinary arts. (Credit: Christa Lopez )

Met Food

The name has changed, if not the number
The name has changed, if not the number of letters: It's now a Key Food, and it's where a young Christopher would try to hustle some legit money. "Biggie was like all the other neighborhood kids -- hanging around in the summer, asking if he could bag groceries for tips," retired owner Wakeem Widdi said in a 2014 statement to DNAInfo. The shop is still located at 991 Fulton St. (Credit: Christa Lopez)

Orient Temple

One of the earliest spots for Biggie performances,
One of the earliest spots for Biggie performances, Orient Temple, 197 St. James Place, hosted "Soul Powers" parties, where he logged stage time. Notorious B.I.G. was so known in the neighborhood that he earned the unofficial title of "Mayor of St. James Place." (Credit: Christa Lopez)

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Country House Diner

Biggie's famous
Biggie's famous "Big Poppa" late-night menu of "T-bone steak, cheese, eggs and Welch's grape" might not be fully available at the Country House Diner, 887 Fulton St., in Clinton Hill, anymore (the menu lacks the meat, in particular), but the MC was a regular diner, according to many. (Credit: Christa Lopez)

Fulton Deli Grocery

Lil' Cease of the Biggie-affiliated Junior M.A.F.I.A. told
Lil' Cease of the Biggie-affiliated Junior M.A.F.I.A. told the New York Times that Fulton Deli Grocery, at the corner of Washington Avenue and Fulton Street, would provide a quick shelter from harsh winter weather (along with a place to hide drugs, when necessary). As Biggie once rhymed, "Used to steal clothes, was considered a thief, until I started hustling on Fulton Street." (Credit: Christa Lopez)

Bedford Avenue and Quincy Street

In 1989, before there was Puff Daddy, Bad
In 1989, before there was Puff Daddy, Bad Boy and inter-coastal rap feuds, there was this corner, where a 17-year-old Biggie Smalls dropped a battle verse so perfect, his opponent had to just walk away. It's since been commemorated with a building-sized street art tribute, pictured. (Credit: Christa Lopez)

Junior's

The original Junior's restaurant at the corner of
The original Junior's restaurant at the corner of Flatbush and DeKalb Avenues has seen many athletes, actors, political figures and singers since its inception in 1950. Biggie was one of them. Wayne Barrow, who produced the 2009 film "Notorious," told Time Out that he believes Biggie used to order strawberry cheesecake and a Coke. A photo of Biggie and Puffy Daddy, pictured, still hangs on the wall today. (Credit: Christa Lopez)

226 St. James Place, #3L

Thirty years of Brooklyn, in one anecdote: On
Thirty years of Brooklyn, in one anecdote: On "Juicy," Notorious B.I.G. called the apartment in which he grew up a "one-room shack." According to Zillow.com, it's now a renovated three-bedroom, one-bathroom apartment which last sold in 2013 for $825,000. (Credit: Christa Lopez)

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