It goes without saying that New York and its music scene have changed tremendously in the past 35 years. That makes it all the more impressive that the CMJ Music Marathon has stayed largely the same. Each October, it fills venues around the city with up-and-coming bands, while mostly staying away from the big names that many other festivals use as hooks.

In the past, CMJ has given an early boost to acts like Arcade Fire, Green Day, Daft Punk and Eminem. This year, more than 1,000 artists will perform at more than 70 venues around the city. Here are a dozen to keep an eye out for, and some are playing as many as five shows so you have lots of options.

The CMJ Music Marathon runs Oct. 13-17. For the full lineup: cmj.com/marathon.

Catfish and the Bottlemen

Even though the group has only released one
Even though the group has only released one album, Welsh band Catfish and the Bottlemen has been touring for years. It shows in Catfish’s radio-friendly rock songs, with anthemic choruses that will appeal to fans of the Arctic Monkeys and The Strokes. (Credit: Thomas Oxley Photography)

Borns

It's no wonder Garrett Borns' debut EP was
It's no wonder Garrett Borns' debut EP was called "Candy." The title befits his sound, which consists of big, bright, harmony-filled electro-pop with hooks that lodge in your brain. His debut full-length, the equally well-titled "Dopamine," is out Oct. 16. (Credit: Windish)

Palehound

This Boston band's debut album,
This Boston band's debut album, "Dry Food," is built around breakup songs with crunchy '90s alt-rock hooks and powerful guitar playing from 21-year-old singer Ellen Kempner. She's already earning comparisons to St. Vincent and Pavement. (Credit: Chad Kamenshine)

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The Wonder Years

Pop-punk band The Wonder Years is practically worshipped
Pop-punk band The Wonder Years is practically worshipped by its fans, who are drawn to singer Dan Campbell's intense lyrics that address topics ranging from his struggle with depression to the death of a loved one to inequality. (Credit: Megan Thompson)

Neon Indian

One of the biggest acts at this year's
One of the biggest acts at this year's festival, Neon Indian's Alan Palomo will celebrate the release of his first album in four years by headlining Webster Hall. If first single "Slumlord" is any indication, the electro-pop star's skills have only sharpened with time. (Credit: Getty Images)

Protomartyr

Detroit's Protomartyr has been winning critical praise for
Detroit's Protomartyr has been winning critical praise for its dark post-punk. The band's music, which has been compared to The Fall and Wire, has become tighter on each album. Its third, the brand new "The Agent Intellect," is named after an ancient philosophical questioning of how the mind operates in relation to the self. (Credit: Zak Bratto)

Car Seat Headrest

Twenty-two-year-old Will Toledo, who records as Car Seat
Twenty-two-year-old Will Toledo, who records as Car Seat Headrest, has released 11 albums of lo-fi bedroom pop in the vein of Guided by Voices and early Beck on Bandcamp over the last four years, selling over 25,000 downloads along the way. He’s poised to reach a much bigger audience now that legendary indie label Matador Records is releasing re-recorded versions of some of those songs, as well as a new album due in 2016. (Credit: Matador Records)

Nikki Hill

Hill is a soul and blues-influenced rocker based
Hill is a soul and blues-influenced rocker based in New Orleans who cites Little Richard and AC/DC's Bon Scott as her heroes, while adding a touch of Amy Winehouse to the mix. She has the chops to make a Lower East Side club feellike a southern roadhouse. (Credit: Aubrey Edwards)

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Tobais Jesso Jr.

Jesso Jr. comes at the '70s from a
Jesso Jr. comes at the '70s from a different angle, bringing back the piano ballads of Randy Newman and Harry Nilsson. His career took off when Adele tweeted about his song "How Could You Babe." (Credit: Sandy Kim)

Ezra Furman and the Boy-Friends

Furman's latest album,
Furman's latest album, "Perpetual Motion People," seems to incorporate the entire history of rock and roll. He takes everything from art-pop to ‘50s doo wop and filters it through his unique perspective, writing about personal topics like gender fluidity, depression and identity. (Credit: Ezra Furman)

Death by Unga Bunga

The cover of Norwegian band Death by Unga
The cover of Norwegian band Death by Unga Bunga’s new EP "Tell Me Why" features a naked mustachioed man from the 1970s lying in bed next to his stereo. It's likely the music coming out of that stereo sounded a lot like Death by Unga Bunga, full of glam-pop riffs and Cheap Trick-worthy choruses. (Credit: Death by Unga Bunga via Facebook)

Archie Powell & the Exports

Like Elvis Costello and Matthew Sweet, Archie Powell
Like Elvis Costello and Matthew Sweet, Archie Powell has a knack for wrapping dark lyrics in upbeat power-pop melodies. It's up to you whether you want to sing along or feel his pain. (Credit: Archie Powell & the Exports via Instagram)