“La La Land” triumphed at Monday’s announcement of the Golden Globe nominations, coming away with seven nods, including best musical film and best performances in a musical for co-stars Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone.

The film, which opened to a whopping $855,000 in just five theaters over the weekend, was a recent winner at the Critics Choice Awards and is widely expected to win the Academy Award for best picture in February. At the Globes, “La La Land” also earned nominations for best original screenplay – the film is not based on a play or any other pre-existing work – and for young director Damien Chazelle.

Like “La La Land,” the other most-nominated films at the Globes are limited releases that have not yet opened widely across the nation. Close behind “La La Land” came “Moonlight,” Barry Jenkins’ art-house hit about a gay African-American boy growing up in a poor Miami neighborhood. Among its six nominations were best dramatic film, best director and original screenplay. Kenneth Lonergan’s “Manchester by the Sea,” which focuses on a solitary Boston-area man who becomes the guardian to his teenage nephew, took away five nominations, including one for Casey Affleck in the dramatic acting category.

A handful of films made stronger than expected showings. “Florence Foster Jenkins,” based on the real-life story of a talentless opera singer who makes it to Carnegie Hall, drew nominations for Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant in the comedic performance categories, bringing the film’s total nods to four. Also earning four nominations, including for best dramatic picture, was “Lion,” about a young man searching for his lost family in India. “Hell or High Water,” a crime thriller starring Jeff Bridges as a Texas cop, barely played in theaters but became a strong critical hit and is now competing for best dramatic picture against the likes of Mel Gibson’s war drama “Hacksaw Ridge, ” which also scored best director and best actor nominations.

Thanks to several high-profile films featuring African-American actors, several showed up in the acting categories. Lead actor Denzel Washington and supporting actress Viola Davis, as a married couple in “Fences,” each took away nominations, while Octavia Spencer took a supporting actress nod for playing a self-taught computer whiz in “Hidden Figures.” Spencer and Davis will also compete in that category against Naomie Harris, who played a crack-addicted mother in “Moonlight.”

Among this year’s surprising omissions were Tom Hanks, who played Capt. Chesley Sullenberger in Clint Eastwood’s “Sully,” and both Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard in the World War II romance “Allied.” Martin Scorsese’s “Silence,” a saga about Jesuit priests in 17th-century Japan, was shut out of the Globes entirely.