To understand Jon Glaser’s series “Neon Joe: Werewolf Hunter” is simply to understand those four words.

“It is a hyper-stupid comedy show about a guy that dresses in neon and hunts werewolves. That’s a pretty good starting point,” Glaser explains. “It’s on Adult Swim, so you probably get some idea of the comedy and stupidity that you’re about to see.”

The series has its second season premiere on May 22, and Glaser will be at a fan “He-Yump-Vent” — “he-yump” being Joe’s catchphrase of sorts — on Friday at The Bell House to celebrate the show. The event will feature a screening of the first two episodes, giveaways (including a “Neon Joe” comic book), a Q&A with Glaser and director John Lee, and more.

Glaser, 48, has been a mainstay around New York City for almost two decades, having spent years as a writer and actor on “Late Night with Conan O’Brien.” The Park Slope resident is perhaps best known for two supporting gigs: Laird Schlesinger on “Girls” and Councilman Jamm on “Parks and Recreation.”

These days, when he’s not clad in gaudy neon, Glaser can also be seen on his truTV show “Jon Glaser Loves Gear,” a docu-series comedy about a guy obsessed with gear.

amNewYork spoke with Glaser about “Neon Joe.”

How do you get into the mindset of playing Joe?

I make that stupid noise a few times and I’m ready to go. [Laughs] I go “he-yump he-yump yump yump” and then I’m ready. Pretty much that simple.

Do you wear neon in your regular life?

Oh, man. No. Although that’s not true. I got some running shoes that got a little neon in them. But other than that I’m not wearing it unless it’s functional, if I’m on my bike.

What’s planned for the event at the Bell House?

I think it’s actually a cool event, especially if you’re a fan of the show. There’s a lot going on. DC made a comic book last season. ... We got really good artists to do the cover, the interior, the color. And it looked great. Just for myself, it was pretty exciting to have a legit comic made. So they made another comic book which also turned out great. The cover is, I think, especially stunning. It looks really good. This artist named Alex Maleev, his work is quite exceptional. So we’re going to be giving away copies of the comic book to everyone that’s there. Alex is actually going to be there, and he and I are going to be available to sign comics before the show starts. ... There’s going to be a short Q&A with me and John Lee who is the director this season. He and I will do a chat before we screen the first two episodes and then after I’m going to sing with a band in character, which will be — I would imagine — nice and dumb.

You call this dumb. How does a so-called dumb idea become a television show?

Whenever I say dumb to me that just means funny. Even though it’s still dumb. For me, the dumber the better. But it still obviously has to be smart. You have to be smart about how dumb you are. And that just comes across in the writing, the directing, the editing — all of it — the acting, the execution of it. ... I’m about to contradict myself — I was going to say it has to be an idea as dumb as it sounds that’s worth pursuing.

What keeps you living in New York City?

I just like it. Obviously it’s a cool place. I was debating a long time ago whether I should move to LA. After I quit “Conan,” that seemed like, well, I guess move to LA now. But I just wanted to try to stay here if I could. I’ve been fortunate to make it work.

You had supporting roles in “Girls” and “Parks and Rec.” How did those roles change your profile?

It certainly raised the profile, I guess. I also feel weird talking about myself in those terms. But I can’t deny that people recognize me from both. It’s hard to say if it’s helped with work or not because I’ve been mostly doing my own thing since I did both of those things. But it’s all been great. It’s been very satisfying to have done two really enjoyable roles. The roles themselves were really fun and both of the shows were also great shows. Two very good experiences for me.