"Girls" creator and star Lena Dunham expanded in a radio interview on a college rape she recounts in her new memoir, "Not That Kind of Girl."

"It was a painful experience physically and emotionally and one I spent a long time trying to reconcile," she told NPR "Fresh Air" host Terry Gross. "I actually [have] been thinking about it a lot this week because I sent an email to somebody who I had known at that time who knew the guy who had perpetrated the act. . . . I wanted to make it clear to this old friend what I felt had happened before he potentially bought the book at Hudson News and read about it."

In her book, Dunham, 28, recalls being drunk and high on Xanax and cocaine at a college party, where a man took her home and raped her while she tried to convince herself the sex was consensual.

Her roommate, she writes, tried to make her understand she was in denial: "Audrey's pale little face goes blank. She clutches my hand and, in a voice reserved for moms in Lifetime movies, whispers, 'You were raped.' I burst out laughing."

She told Gross that in her email to the mutual acquaintance, "I said . . . 'I spent so much time scared; I spent so much time ashamed. I don't feel that way anymore and it's not because of my job, it's not because of my boyfriend, it's not because of feminism, though all those things helped. It's because I told the story. And I'm still here, and my identity hasn't shifted in some way that I can't repair. And I still feel like myself and I feel less alone.' "