New Yorkers Thursday were happy to hear that Stephen Colbert would be succeeding David Letterman on “Late Show.”

The enthusiasm seemed to cross many age groups and demographics, in terms of both Letterman fans and ambivalent viewers such as 62-year old businessman Jeff Gilbert, from the Bronx.

“I’m thrilled. I watch Letterman here and there, but I’ll definitely watch more with Colbert,” he said.

Mariana Mingo, 41, added: “I’m excited about it. I love Stephen Colbert, I think he’s so clever.”

Casey Krugman, 32, a product developer from Gowanus, can’t wait.
“I think it’s the perfect choice. I watch Letterman now, but I’m a bigger Colbert fan. I’ll probably watch more now,” Krugman said.

Some were less impressed.

Carlos Rodriguez, 30, a fresh fish deliveryman from Hell’s Kitchen said, “I wouldn’t pick him to replace Letterman. I don’t like Stephen Colbert’s personality. When Letterman talks to you, you feel like he’s there, you know, you can feel the vibe, even through the TV. With Colbert, I don’t feel that same vibe. I’ll definitely watch less now.”

Of course, fewer people watch late-night television these days.

“I love Colbert, but at the same time, I don’t know anybody that watches late-night comedy, except for my parents,” said Nicholas DiSanto of Park Slope.

As for as late-night TV getting another white man as host, instead of a woman or a person of color?

“It’s just par for the course,” said Eric Jordan, a 50-year-old writer.

Nicholas DiSanto, 33, of Park Slope, loved the move.

“I don’t like Letterman, but I love Colbert. I think Colbert is going to do a great job,” he said.