Tommy Page, Bill Paxton, Chuck Berry and more recent notable deaths around the world.

Colin Dexter

Colin Dexter, the unassuming British writer who created
Colin Dexter, the unassuming British writer who created curmudgeonly, music-loving Oxford detective Inspector Morse, died March 21, 2017. He was 86. In this Oct. 27, 2000 photo, Dexter shows his Order of the British Empire medal. Newsday's obituary for Colin Dexter
(Credit: AP / John Stillwell)

Robert Silvers

Robert Silvers, co-founder of The New York Review
Robert Silvers, co-founder of The New York Review of Books, died March 20, 2017, at his home in Manhattan after a brief illness. He was 87. Above, he speaks at the 2006 National Book Awards in New York on Nov. 15, 2006. Newsday's obituary for Robert Silvers
(Credit: AP / Stuart Ramson )

Sok An

Cambodian Deputy Prime Minister Sok An died in
Cambodian Deputy Prime Minister Sok An died in a Beijing hospital on March 15, 2017. He was 66. Above, Sok An, center, speaks during a news conference in Phnom Penh on Aug. 7, 2014. Newsday's obituary for Sok An
(Credit: Getty Images / Tang Chhin Sothy)

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Chuck Barris

Chuck Barris, who created popular TV game shows
Chuck Barris, who created popular TV game shows such as "The Dating Game," "The Newlywed Game" and "The Gong Show," died March 21, 2017, of natural causes in his Palisades, N.Y., home. He was 87. This photo is from Dec. 8, 2004. Newsday's obituary for Chuck Barris
(Credit: Getty Images / Stephen Shugerman)

David Rockefeller

David Rockefeller, the billionaire philanthropist who was the
David Rockefeller, the billionaire philanthropist who was the last of his generation in the famously philanthropic Rockefeller family, died March 20, 2017. He was 101. He is shown in a May 15, 2007, photo. Newsday's obituary for David Rockefeller
(Credit: AP)

James Cotton

Legendary blues man James Cotton, who learned to
Legendary blues man James Cotton, who learned to play the harmonica as a child in the Mississippi Delta and went on to be a major figure in blues music as a sideman to Muddy Waters and as a Grammy Award-winning solo performer, died March 16, 2017. He was 81. He is shown at the B.B. King Blues Club in Manhattan on Aug. 17, 2005. Newsday's obituary for James Cotton
(Credit: AP / Jeff Christensen)

Jimmy Breslin

Jimmy Breslin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning chronicler of wiseguys
Jimmy Breslin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning chronicler of wiseguys and underdogs who became the brash embodiment of the old-time, street smart New Yorker, died of complications from pneumonia March 19, 2017. He is shown in a Nov. 5, 1991 photo. Newsday's obituary for Jimmy Breslin
(Credit: AP / Wyatt Counts)

Chuck Barris

Chuck Barris, who created popular TV game shows
Chuck Barris, who created popular TV game shows such as "The Dating Game," "The Newlywed Game" and "The Gong Show," died March 21, 2017, of natural causes in his Palisades, N.Y., home. He was 87. This photo is from Dec. 8, 2004. Newsday's obituary for Chuck Barris
(Credit: Getty Images / Stephen Shugerman)

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Royal Robbins

Mountaineer Royal Robbins, who founded the outdoor clothing
Mountaineer Royal Robbins, who founded the outdoor clothing company bearing his name, died March 14, 2017, after a long illness. He was 82. He is shown in a Jan. 28, 2009 photo. Newsday's obituary for Royal Robbins
(Credit: AP / Brian Ramsay)

Chuck Berry

Chuck Berry, rock 'n' roll's founding guitar hero
Chuck Berry, rock 'n' roll's founding guitar hero and storyteller who defined the music's joy and rebellion in such classics as "Johnny B. Goode," ''Sweet Little Sixteen" and "Roll Over Beethoven," died March 18, 2017. He was 90. He is shown dancing on stage at the Presidential Gala for President-elect Clinton and Vice President Al Gore on Jan. 19, 1993, at the Capital Centre in Landover, Md. Newsday's obituary for Chuck Berry
(Credit: AP / Amy Sancetta)

Fiora Corradetti Contino

Fiora Corradetti Contino, a Long Island native who
Fiora Corradetti Contino, a Long Island native who belonged to the elite cohort of female conductors who achieved long, successful careers in operatic, orchestral and choral music, died March 5, 2017. She was 91. Newsday's obituary for Fiora Corradetti Contino
(Credit: YouTube)

Cardinal Miloslav Vlk

Prague Cardinal Miloslav Vlk, who ministered clandestinely to
Prague Cardinal Miloslav Vlk, who ministered clandestinely to Catholics for years while officially working as a window-washer during communist rule in Czechoslovakia, died of cancer March 18, 2017. He was 84. He is shown in a 2010 photo. Newsday's obituary for Cardinal Miloslav Vlk
(Credit: AP / Petr David Josek)

Dave Stallworth

Former Knick Dave Stallworth, left, who played a
Former Knick Dave Stallworth, left, who played a key role in the team's NBA Finals win over the Los Angeles Lakers in 1970, died Marach 15, 2017. He was 75. He is shown in a 1969 photo. Newsday's obituary for Dave Stallworth
(Credit: AP)

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Derek Walcott

Derek Walcott, a Nobel laureate in literature who became
Derek Walcott, a Nobel laureate in literature who became one of the English-speaking world's most renowned poets by portraying the lush, complex world of the Caribbean with a precise language that echoed the classics of literature, died March 19, 2017. He was 87. Newsday's obituary for Derek Walcott
(Credit: AP / Berenice Bautista)

Tommy LiPuma

Tommy LiPuma, a jazz and pop producer who
Tommy LiPuma, a jazz and pop producer who won Grammys for collaborations with Natalie Cole and George Benson, died March 13, 2017 after a brief illness. He was 80. Newsday's obituary for Tommy LiPuma
(Credit: AP / Gill LiPuma)

Jack Harris

Jack Harris, who cemented his place in Hollywood
Jack Harris, who cemented his place in Hollywood history by producing the 1958 horror film "The Blob," died of natural causes on March 14, 2017. He was 98. Harris is seen in a photo taken in 2014. Newsday's obituary for Jack Harris
(Credit: AP / Rich Prugh)

Richard H. Solomon

Richard H. Solomon, a China scholar who assisted
Richard H. Solomon, a China scholar who assisted in the historic "Ping-Pong diplomacy" that led to the opening of U.S.-Sino relations in the 1970s; who became an authority on China's pressure tactics during negotiations; and who, as a top American diplomat, helped end a long-running conflict in Cambodia, died on March 13, 2017. He was 79. Newsday's obituary for Richard H. Solomon
(Credit: The LIFE Images Collection / Getty / Forrest Anderson)

Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Amy Krouse Rosenthal, a popular author, filmmaker and
Amy Krouse Rosenthal, a popular author, filmmaker and speaker who brightened lives with her wide-eyed and generous spirit -- and broke hearts when she wrote of being terminally ill and leaving behind her husband, Jason -- died of ovarian cancer on March 13, 2017. She was 51. Rosenthal is seen in a photo taken on Aug. 1, 2016. Newsday's obituary for Amy Krouse Rosenthal
(Credit: AP)

Joni Sledge

Joni Sledge, who with her sisters recorded the
Joni Sledge, who with her sisters recorded the enduring dance anthem "We Are Family," died on March 10, 2017. She was 60. Sledge is seen in a photo taken on Aug. 14, 2006. Newsday's obituary for Joni Sledge
(Credit: AP / Chris Polk )

Stephen Ross

Stephen Ross, a prize-winning economist and professor at
Stephen Ross, a prize-winning economist and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, died on March 3, 2017. He was 73. Newsday's obituary for Stephen Ross
(Credit: Erica Ferrone for MIT Sloan School of Management)

Mother Divine

Mother Divine, the widow of Father Divine and
Mother Divine, the widow of Father Divine and leader for decades of a religious movement he founded that advocated racial equality and provided free food to thousands of people, died on March 4, 2017. She is believed to have been 92. Newsday's obituary for Mother Divine
(Credit: AP / Michael Mercanti)

Robert James Waller

Robert James Waller, author of
Robert James Waller, author of "The Bridges of Madison County," died on March 10, 2017. He was 77. Waller is seen in a photo taken on July 15, 1993. Newsday's obituary for Robert James Waller
(Credit: Newsday / Bruce Gilbert)

Keith Tonkel

The Rev. Keith Tonkel, one of 28 white
The Rev. Keith Tonkel, one of 28 white United Methodist ministers who signed a statement condemning segregation and racism in the Deep South in 1963, died March 8, 2017 after experiencing a heart problem. He was 81. Newsday's obituary for Keith Tonkel
(Credit: AP / Rogelio V. Solis)

Bill Hands

Former pitcher Bill Hands, seen in a 1968
Former pitcher Bill Hands, seen in a 1968 photo, a 20-game winner for the 1969 Cubs, died March 9, 2017 after a brief illness. He was 76. Newsday's obituary for Bill Hands
(Credit: AP)

Howard Hodgkin

Renowned English artist Howard Hodgkin, whose bold paintings
Renowned English artist Howard Hodgkin, whose bold paintings fused abstraction with the glorious beauty of nature, died March 9, 2017. He was 84. Newsday's obituary for Howard Hodgkin
(Credit: Getty Images / Rob Stothard)

Lynne Stewart

Lynne Stewart, the outspoken civil rights lawyer who
Lynne Stewart, the outspoken civil rights lawyer who represented the downtrodden and was disbarred and jailed after being convicted of helping a terrorist client communicate with followers, died of cancer March 7, 2017. She was 77. The photo is from Nov. 19, 2009 outside federal court in Manhattan. Newsday's obituary for Lynne Stewart
(Credit: AP)

Lou Duva

Boxing Hall of Famer Lou Duva, seen in
Boxing Hall of Famer Lou Duva, seen in a 1991 photo, who handled the careers of 19 champions including heavyweight titlist Evander Holyfield, died March 8, 2017. He was 94. Newsday's obituary for Lou Duva
(Credit: AP)

Bill Webb

The SNY broadcast team for Mets game, from
The SNY broadcast team for Mets game, from left: Ron Darling, coordinating producer Gregg Picker, Gary Cohen, director Bill Webb and Keith Hernandez at Citi Field on May 30, 2012. Webb, the lead television director for Mets games for nearly four decades and an iconic figure in sports media, died March 7, 2017 after a long battle with cancer. He was 66. Newsday's obituary for Bill Webb
(Credit: David Pokress)

Joseph Rogers Sr.

Joseph Wilson Rogers Sr., Waffle House co-founder, who
Joseph Wilson Rogers Sr., Waffle House co-founder, who went from short-order cook to co-founder of one of the nation's largest restaurant chains, died March 3, 2017. Rogers Sr., seen here in 2005, was 97. Newsday's obituary for Joseph Rogers Sr.
(Credit: AP / Ric Feld )

Mike Barhorst

Mike Barhorst, center, an Ohio man who each
Mike Barhorst, center, an Ohio man who each summer turned his family campground into one of the largest outdoor concerts in the nation, died March 1, 2017. He was 77. Newsday's obituary for Mike Barhorst
(Credit: AP / Anthony Weber)

Robert Osborne

Robert Osborne, a film historian and journalist who
Robert Osborne, a film historian and journalist who became known to millions as the genial and erudite host on Turner Classic Movies, died March 6, 2017. He was 84. Newsday's obituary for Robert Osborne
(Credit: AP / Annie I. Bang)

Dr. Thomas Starzl

Dr. Thomas Starzl, who pioneered liver transplant surgery
Dr. Thomas Starzl, who pioneered liver transplant surgery in the 1960s and was a leading researcher into anti-rejection drugs, died March 4, 2017. Starzl, seen here on Nov. 10, 1989, was 90. Newsday's obituary for Dr. Thomas Starzl
(Credit: AP)

Miriam Colon

President Barack Obama awards the 2014 National Medal
President Barack Obama awards the 2014 National Medal of Arts to actress, theater founder, and director Miriam Colon during a ceremony at the White House in Washington, D.C. Colon, an icon in U.S. Latino theater who starred in films alongside Marlon Brando and Al Pacino, died March 3, 2017. She was 80. Newsday's obituary for Miriam Colon
(Credit: AP / Andrew Harnik)

Helen Marshall

Helen Marshall, the first African-American Queens borough president,
Helen Marshall, the first African-American Queens borough president, died March 4, 2017. Marshall, June 16, 2005, was 87. Newsday's obituary for Helen Marshall
(Credit: Newsday / Alejandra Villa)

Tommy Page

Tommy Page, the pop star-turned-music executive known for
Tommy Page, the pop star-turned-music executive known for the song "I'll Be Your Everything," died March 3, 2017. He was 46. Newsday's obituary for Tommy Page
(Credit: Getty Images for AWXI / Robin Marchant)

Rene Preval

Rene Preval, who was the only democratically elected
Rene Preval, who was the only democratically elected president of Haiti to win and complete two terms but was criticized for his handling of the devastating January 2010 earthquake, died March 3, 2017. Preval, seen on May 14, 2006, was 74. Newsday's obituary for Rene Preval
(Credit: AP)

Paula Fox

Author Paula Fox, known for the novels
Author Paula Fox, known for the novels "Desperate Characters" and "Poor George" and the memoir "Borrowed Finery." died March 1, 2017. Fox, seen on March 24, 2011, was 93. Newsday's obituary for Paula Fox
(Credit: AP)

David Rubinger

David Rubinger, above on Oct. 25, 2013, whose
David Rubinger, above on Oct. 25, 2013, whose photos of Israeli paratroopers at the Western Wall holy site became an iconic image of the 1967 Mideast war, died March 1, 2017. He was 92 Newsday's obituary for David Rubinger
(Credit: EPA / Jim Hollander)

Gustav Metzger

Gustav Metzger, whose concept of
Gustav Metzger, whose concept of "auto-destructive art" inspired The Who's Pete Townshend to smash his guitars, died March 1, 2017. He was 90. Above, Metzger on Nov. 4, 2015. Newsday's obituary for Gustav Metzger
(Credit: Getty Images / Tristan Fewings)

Dick Bruna

Dick Bruna, a Dutch children's author and illustrator
Dick Bruna, a Dutch children's author and illustrator who was celebrated for the simplicity of his depictions of Miffy, a white rabbit who has delighted preschoolers the world over for six decades, died Feb. 16, 2017. Bruna, seen in a photo from March 31, 2011, was 89. Newsday's obituary for Dick Bruna
(Credit: EPA / Koen van Weel)

Ward B. Chamberlin Jr.

Ward B. Chamberlin Jr.,who pioneered public broadcasting, led
Ward B. Chamberlin Jr.,who pioneered public broadcasting, led stations in New York and Washington and helped launch the career of Oscar-nominated documentarian Ken Burns, died Feb. 23, 2017 of complications from dementia. He was 95. Newsday's obituary for Ward B. Chamberlin Jr.
(Credit: WNET)

Stanley Dearman

Former Neshoba County Democrat newspaper publisher Stanley Dearman,
Former Neshoba County Democrat newspaper publisher Stanley Dearman, left, is seen in Philadelphia, Miss., on June 20, 2004. Dearman, who pushed for justice in the murders of three civil rights workers, died Feb. 25, 2017. He was 84. Newsday's obituary for Stanley Dearman
To Dearman's side is Carolyn Goodman, the mother of one of the three civil rights workers murdered by a Ku Klux Klan mob on June 21, 1964. (Credit: AP / Rogelio Solis )

Joseph Wapner

Joseph Wapner, the retired Los Angeles judge who
Joseph Wapner, the retired Los Angeles judge who presided over "The People's Court" with steady force during the heyday of the reality courtroom show, died Feb. 26, 2017. He was 97. Above, Wapner is seen on Oct. 22, 1986. Newsday's obituary for Joseph Wapner
(Credit: AP / Galbraith)

Neil Fingleton

Neil Fingleton, the 7-foot-7-inch British actor who played
Neil Fingleton, the 7-foot-7-inch British actor who played Mag the Mighty on "Game of Thrones," died of heart failure on Feb. 25, 2017. He was 36. Above, Fingleton as the fearsome Mag in the 2011 "GoT" episode "The Watchers on The Wall." Newsday's obituary for Neil Fingleton
(Credit: HBO / Helen Sloan)

Jay Cronley

Author and longtime newspaper columnist Jay Cronley, whose
Author and longtime newspaper columnist Jay Cronley, whose books were made into movies starring some of Hollywood's most notable funnymen, died Feb. 26, 2017. He was 73. Newsday's obituary for Jay Cronley
(Credit: AP / Tom Gilbert)

Peter Gimbel

Peter Gimbel, a Long Island native who faced
Peter Gimbel, a Long Island native who faced the challenges of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, was a social worker who advocated for independent living for people with disabilities. Gimbel died Jan. 9, 2017, after a monthlong battle with a respiratory illness. He was 33. Newsday's obituary for Peter Gimbel
(Credit: Jessica Resnick-Ault)

Kenneth Arrow

President George W. Bush presents the National Medal
President George W. Bush presents the National Medal of Science to Dr. Kenneth J. Arrow of Stanford University during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, D.C., in 2004. Arrow, the youngest ever winner of a Nobel prize for economics, died Feb. 21, 2017. He was 95. Newsday's obituary for Kenneth Arrow
(Credit: AP / Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Bill Paxton

Bill Paxton, the actor known for his roles
Bill Paxton, the actor known for his roles in films such as "Titanic" and "Twister," died Feb. 25, 2017, of complications due to surgery. He was 61. Newsday's obituary for Bill Paxton
(Credit: Christopher Polk / Getty Images)

Bernie Custis

Bernie Custis shows off the award for Canadian
Bernie Custis shows off the award for Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union coach of the year in Toronto in 1982. Custis, pro football's first black quarterback who blazed the trail for future CFL stars Warren Moon, Chuck Ealey and Damon Allen, died Feb. 23, 2017. He was 88. Newsday's obituary for Bernie Custis
(Credit: AP / Julien LeBourdais)

Fritz Koenig

Fritz Koenig, a German sculptor whose work
Fritz Koenig, a German sculptor whose work "The Sphere" became a symbol of resilience after the 9/11 attacks in New York, died Feb. 22, 2017. He was 92. Newsday's obituary for Fritz Koenig
(Credit: AP / Beth A. Keiser )
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