With season 42 of "Saturday Night Live" coming to an end this weekend, we're feeling nostalgic.

The late-night talk show has given us some pretty hilarious guest-star sketches this year and last, but we can't help but remember the greats who've once called themselves an official part of the show — or still do.

Here's a look at some of our favorite past and present "SNL" cast members, ordered by date of departure.

Kate McKinnon

Kate McKinnon has come a long way since
Kate McKinnon has come a long way since she first appeared as Tabatha Coffey in 2012. The current cast member's fame really took off with her Hillary Clinton impressions during the 2016 presidential election, but she continued to shine as Kellyanne Conway after Trump became president. With roles like "Rough Night" set for 2017 release, perhaps McKinnon's best is yet to come. (Credit: YouTube / Saturday Night Live)

Kenan Thompson

"SNL" veteran Kenan Thompson joined the cast in 2003 after a six-year run on "All That," bringing along his 1997 "Good Burger" role with sketch partner Kel Mitchell. A "Weekend Update" regular, he's among the longest-running cast members in the show's history. (Credit: NBC Universal Inc.)

Seth Meyers

Seth Meyers, right, joined the cast in 2001.
Seth Meyers, right, joined the cast in 2001. The former "Weekend Update" host tried his hand on the writers' team in 2005, a role he kept until 2014 and returned to a few times after. He's since gone on to host his own talk show, you know, "Late Night with Seth Meyers," so we'd say he's doing pretty well. (Credit: NBC/ Dana Edelson)

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Andy Samberg

Any millennial can recite at least one of
Any millennial can recite at least one of Andy Samberg's "SNL" sketches -- especially that one 2006 appearance featuring Maya Rudolph and Justin Timberlake when he sang about a special "present" in a box, or any other Lonely Island appearance. Samberg announced his departure in 2012 after joining the cast seven years earlier, but like many an "SNL" alum, that definitely wasn't the last time he graced our TVs on the late-night show. He hosted for the first time in 2014 after being cast as the lead, Detective Jake Peralta, in "Brooklyn Nine-Nine" on Fox. (Credit: NBC / Dana Edelson)

Kristen Wiig

Kristen Wiig, who first appeared on the show
Kristen Wiig, who first appeared on the show in 2005 with "The Soaking Wet Killer," is probably still best known for her sketches, if they haven't been dethroned in fans' minds by 2011's "Bridesmaids" and 2016's "Ghostbusters." She returned one year after a brief 2012 exit and has popped up again every year since. (Credit: NBC / Dana Edelson)

Amy Poehler

We're super thankful for
We're super thankful for "SNL" for giving us the duo that has become Amy Poehler and Tina Fey ("Sisters"). Also on our list of things to be grateful for, Poehler's Hillary Clinton impression. After joining in 2001, Poehler remained a cast member for seven years and then introduced us to the fabulous land of Pawnee ("Parks and Recreation") one year later. (Credit: NBC )

Maya Rudolph

Of her more than 250
Of her more than 250 "SNL" sketches, we're still hooked on Maya Rudolph's Donatella Versace bathtub role in 2001 and "Mom Jeans" sketch in 2003. Spanning beyond her seven-year run as a cast member (2000-2007), Rudolph played a pretty royal Queen Bey after that whole elevator ordeal with Solange and Jay Z in 2014. Rudolph has gone on to give us "Bridesmaids" after her initial stint on "SNL." Here's hoping she makes an appearance as Queen Bey again after the singer gives birth to her twins. (Credit: NBC / Dana Edelson)

Tina Fey

Tina Fey was great as a
Tina Fey was great as a "Weekend Update" co-host, but fans will most likely always remember her Sarah Palin impressions as her best. The former cast member, who lasted from 2000 to 2006, gave us "30 Rock," "Mean Girls," "Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt," and other movies and shows we're super thankful for after she left the show. (Credit: NBC)

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Jimmy Fallon

Jimmy Fallon left his former
Jimmy Fallon left his former "Weekend Update" co-host Tina Fey and "SNL" behind (temporarily) in 2004 after first appearing in 1998 to chase other career options. Of course, it worked out for the breakout star, now "Tonight Show" host, who has popped up in plenty of sketches since. (Credit: NBC / Mary Ellen Matthews)

Will Ferrell

Will Ferrell made every sketch he was in
Will Ferrell made every sketch he was in better -- a lot better, but some may argue he reached his comedy peak after leaving the show in 2002. With seven years of "SNL" experience under his belt, he moved on to the memorable "Elf" (2003), "Anchorman" (2004), "Wedding Crashers" (2005) and "Step Brothers" (2008). (Credit: NBC)

Adam Sandler

Adam Sandler and
Adam Sandler and "SNL" gave us "The Chanukah Song," so, is there another explanation needed? Whether you're a fan of Sandler's comedies ("Happy Gilmore," "Billy Madison," "50 First Dates") or not, you still know all the words to his "Weekend Update" song that still plays on the radio every holiday season. Sandler's era lasted from 1990 to 1995. (Credit: NBC)

Mike Myers

Mike Myers' appearances since his 1989 to 1995
Mike Myers' appearances since his 1989 to 1995 reign have been few and far between, but we'll always remember him for his Wayne of "Wayne's World" on "SNL" -- if not his "Austin Powers" role which came right after. (Credit: NBC)

Phil Hartman

To this day, the late Phil Hartman remains
To this day, the late Phil Hartman remains one of the show's most versatile cast member ever. With a reign from 1986 to 1994, his most memorable roles were his Bill Clinton and Frank Sinatra impersonations. (Credit: NBC)

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Eddie Murphy

Eddie Murphy revolutionized the show and single-handedly saved
Eddie Murphy revolutionized the show and single-handedly saved it from cancellation. He was a cast member between 1980 and 1984, leaving us with memorable characters including his Mr. Robinson parody. He returned for the show's 40th anniversary in 2015 after a decades-long hiatus. (Credit: NBC)