Singer Zayn Malik, who suffers from an anxiety disorder that caused him to cancel a show in June, apologized to fans Tuesday after calling off a Dubai concert scheduled for next month.

“I have been working over the last three months to overcome my extreme anxiety around major live solo performances,” the former One Direction member, 23, said in a statement on the website of concert promoter 117 Live. “I feel I am making progress but I have today acknowledged that I do not feel sufficiently confident to move forward with the planned show in Dubai in October.” He had been scheduled to appear at the Autism Rocks Arena in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, on the southeastern coast of the Persian Gulf.

“I am assured that all tickets will be refunded,” he continued. “I am truly sorry to disappoint you. I hope to see you all soon.”

He added a thank you to “all my fans who support me globally,” he said.

117 Live chief executive Thomas Ovesen said in a statement, “Whilst disappointed not to be hosting the planned Oct 7th Dubai concert we appreciate Zayn’s honest apologies and wish him all the best for the future,” adding, “We will be looking forward to sharing more of Zayn’s plans with his Middle East fans when we have such information and will now get the ticket refund process started!!” The website gave instructions on receiving full refunds.

In June, the “Pillowtalk” singer canceled his performance at the Capital Summertime Ball in London, explaining on social media that “my anxiety that has haunted me throughout the last few months around live performances has gotten the better of me. . . . With the magnitude of the event, I have suffered the worst anxiety of my career. I cannot apologize enough but I want to be honest with everyone who has patiently waited to see me. I promise I will do my best to make this up to everybody I’ve let down today.”

He added, “I hope those who suffer anxiety will understand. And I hope those who don’t can empathise with my situation,” he said, using the British spelling.

In the United States, 18.1 percent of the adult population suffers from one of a wide variety of anxiety disorders, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.