New Year's resolutions don't have to be all about health and personal life goals. As we head into 2015, it's important for people to organize their career paths as well.

Akida Phillip, career services coordinator at the New York Career Institute, says a long-term strategy is crucial.

"Take stock of where you are now and where you'd like to be in five years, 10 years and beyond," he said. "Set specific and realistic goals for yourself and identify milestones, such as 'become a supervisor within three years.'"

Here are some New Year's resolutions that can help employees take the next step in 2015:

 

Earn a promotion

Piera Palazzolo, senior vice president of marketing at Dale Carnegie Training, said the start of a new year is the perfect time to assess a possible promotion. "Whether or not it's time for a promotion in the near future varies for each individual," she said. "But in order to determine this, employees should take the beginning of the new year to assess their responsibilities and additional duties that would accompany the promotion." Meet with your boss and see what's required to take a step up the ladder.

 

Master a new skill

Education and training shouldn't stop just because a person has been out of school for years. "A way to become an invaluable part of an organization is to make yourself an expert at something that the company values or needs," Phillip said. Whether it's obtaining a higher certification or learning a new computer program, it's important for employees to exercise their brains and to keep their skills relevant as their industries evolve.

 

Get to know your co-workers

According to a 2013 Dale Carnegie study, 54% of those polled said they are more engaged at work when their bosses care about their personal lives. "A great resolution is to work toward building a more personal working relationship," Palazzolo said. "Employees or managers can accomplish this goal by asking questions about personal lives outside of work, being good listeners and becoming genuinely interested in the other person."