When Nina Faulhaber and Meg He launched their London- and SoHo-based apparel brand ADAY, there was one textile factory they wanted to manufacture their leggings, crop tops and tanks.

They flew to Porto, Portugal, and knocked on the doors of Petratex.

“They are the thought leaders in active and also high fashion,” Faulhaber said. “It’s the best of both worlds.”

Petratex notably manufactured Speedo’s LZR Racer, a high-tech swimsuit made out of polyurethane and elastane-nylon that made headlines when athletes wearing the full-body suits — including Michael Phelps — broke records during the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The controversial swimsuits have since been banned from Olympic competition.

ADAY isn’t necessarily about Olympic-level performance, though.

“Our philosophy is we want to give you a garment you can do anything in,” Faulhaber said. “We have such high expectations for our own garments, for normal life, when working out and traveling in.”

The lifestyle brand’s tops and bottoms feature sweat-wicking fabrics that don’t chaff or wrinkle with a sleek, technical finish.

Several products also feature an Olympic-standard bonded seam — common in swimwear — that leads to a more durable, lightweight garment than a sewn seam. These include ADAY’s uber-popular Throw and Roll leggings. Perpetually sold out since the company launched last year, the leggings will once again be available July 12 for $125 at ADAY’s website, where they are currently available for preorder.

The leggings are made with a nylon-elastane fabric blend that sculpts to the body. “They have a tucking effect,” Faulhaber said. “The bonding really structures it.”

ADAY’s Dream Harder tank ($50) also features the bonded technology. “It’s super-smooth on the skin,” Faulhaber said.

The names of ADAY’s products are meant to provide inspiration, too, Faulhaber noted. Among the more than dozen activewear pieces, there’s the Dream Harder tank, Don’t Stop top, Like a Boss sweatshirt and Run the World jacket — whether you’re running a marathon or running to catch a flight.