The Bronx Zoo welcomed two new residents Thursday, and we just had to give you a peek.

These male Aldabra tortoises are members of one of just two remaining giant tortoise species. And they don't use the term "giant" lightly-- in fact, at about 400 and 600 pounds, they don't do anything lightly.

Meet the tortoises

Aldabra tortoises are known for their domed shells,
Aldabra tortoises are known for their domed shells, limbs covered in bony scales and long, muscular necks, according to the Wildlife Conservation Society. All that considered, we think they're pretty cute. (Credit: Julie Larsen Maher © Wildlife Conservation Society)

Say hello!

You might want to get on these guys'

You might want to get on these guys' good sides, because they'll be around for a while. Aldabra tortoises are believed to live 200-plus years. Unfortunately, the species is classified as vulnerable, with an estimated 100,000 of them remaining in the world.

(Credit: Julie Larsen Maher © Wildlife Conservation Society)

Watch them munch

These herbivores got to their colossal size by

These herbivores got to their colossal size by snacking on grass, herbs, leaves, fruits and berries. They tend to flock to areas with lots of vegetation, and spend much of their time looking for food and grazing. Wouldn't you if you were a 600-pound vegetarian?

(Credit: Julie Larsen Maher © Wildlife Conservation Society)

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Get up close and personal!

These herbivores got to their colossal size by
Aldabra tortoises are known by natives of the Indian Ocean's Aldabra Islands to have no fear of humans. Just watch the friendly guys' eagerness to take a #tortoiseselfie and you'll understand.

Watch them roam

These herbivores got to their colossal size by
The tortoises' new digs are located at the Bronx Zoo's Zoo Center, and are modeled to resemble their natural habitat with sand, lush vegetation and a freshwater pool. They like to take refuge in shallow water on hot days. Even though they're land-dwellers, these island natives know how to swim.