Times Square, Central Park, Grand Central Terminal: these are all great spots to visit and snap photos of in New York City. But there are other lesser-known locations that may hold even more beauty than you would think.

Take your camera with you to any one of these spots and you may just be surprised at these hidden gems.

The Ford Foundation Building

Designed by award-winning New York architect Kevin Roche
Designed by award-winning New York architect Kevin Roche and built in 1968, the Ford Foundation Building is just as beautiful on the inside as it is on the outside and is an ideal escape for New York nature lovers. The building's lush, indoor garden, abundantly oozing over the sides of the brick walkways, creates a serene atmosphere and is the perfect place to stop in and snap a few cover photos when you're in the neighborhood. (320 East 43rd Street) (Credit: Flickr / Rian Castillo )

The Washington Mews

Stop by the Village to add an academic
Stop by the Village to add an academic flair to your photographs at NYU's Washington Mews, sectioned off between Fifth Avenue and University Place. The Mews, a private gated street, has a long and complex history with the University. Originally used as stables for horses, the buildings have since been converted into offices and faculty living areas. The classic brick roads and moss slowly climbing up the sides of the quaint buildings give the street an otherworldly feel when you set foot inside the gates. (Located in Greenwich Village) (Credit: Flickr / Wally Gobetz)

Tudor City

Take some selfies in the shade by these
Take some selfies in the shade by these historic East Side apartment complexes, affectionately named after England's Tudor dynasty. The city, known for its picturesque trees and large rooftop sign proclaiming its name, stretches along six blocks and because East 41st and 43rd Streets end in cul-de-sacs, the traffic is often forced to go around, giving the section a less hectic atmosphere. Formerly an area consisting mainly of slaughterhouses, Tudor City now features 15 buildings and four parks, and is a stone throw away from the United Nations Headquarters. The scenic area has served as the filming location of such movies as "The Godfather Part III," The Spider-Man trilogy and "Taxi Driver," and is waiting for you to come and take some photographs of your own. (Southern edge of Turtle Bay on the East Side of Manhattan) (Credit: Flickr / Jeffery Zeldman)

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Irish Hunger Memorial Park

This spot is not only beautiful to photograph,
This spot is not only beautiful to photograph, but it’s a beautiful tribute, too. It serves as a reminder of the Great Irish Famine that left millions starving to death. Making sure that this tragedy was never forgotten, the Irish Hunger Memorial Park is a place that raises public awareness and pride for anyone who is of Irish heritage—which, in New York City, has a count of nearly 800,000 people with Irish descent. (Vesey Street) (Credit: Flickr/Harvey Barrison)

Fort Tryon Park

Gifted by John D. Rockefeller in 1917, Fort
Gifted by John D. Rockefeller in 1917, Fort Tryon Park is a gorgeous spot filled with natural beauty, manmade art, and a stellar view of the Hudson River. An added bonus: above its grounds are the Cloisters, a part of the Metropolitan Museum that is actually a medieval monastery that holds thousands of medieval works. This calls for a bunch of photo opportunities. (Riverside Drive To Broadway, W 192 Street To Dyckman Street) (Credit: Flickr/Kristine Paulus)

Roosevelt Island Smallpox Hospital

Roosevelt Island is an isolated island, accessible to-and-from
Roosevelt Island is an isolated island, accessible to-and-from New York City by ferry, that held patients infected by small pox in the late 1800’s. Now abandoned, the Roosevelt Island Smallpox Hospital is a city landmark, a space to visit to capture photos of the ruins of something that once was so very important. (Located on Roosevelt Island) (Credit: Flickr/Addison Godel )

Pomander Walk

Nestled in the Upper West Side is Pomander
Nestled in the Upper West Side is Pomander Walk, a street that looks as if you’re peeking into the past. This block holds twenty-seven buildings, all with colorful doors and shutters. The downside: the block is gated, so you can’t take a stroll down this fantastic street, but you can look through the gate and try to snap some shots. We suggest getting to know someone who has property on the block if you want a better look. (94th to 95th Street, between Broadway and West End Avenue) (Credit: Flickr/Sonja Stark)

Garden of Stones

Though this may look like just a space
Though this may look like just a space filled with rocks, there is a ton of meaning behind the Garden of Stones. Artist Andy Goldsworthy created this space, meant to be viewed as a living memorial garden. Within the stones are trees that were planted by Goldsworthy, as well as survivors of the Holocaust. Make sure to stop here and take a moment to capture the beauty in its simplicity. (36 Battery Place) (Credit: Flickr/cmkalina)

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Four Freedoms Park

If not for any other reason than to
If not for any other reason than to capture an image of the bust of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Four Freedoms Park is a location that is definitely photo-worthy. As a tribute to the late President Roosevelt, this spot is less like a park and more like a piece of architecture. Past the perfectly lined rows of trees is both the sculpture of the President, as well as a roofless monument, with excerpts from Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms Speech carved into its walls. The Four Freedoms Park also offers excellent views of the New York skyline. (1 FDR Four Freedoms Park) (Credit: Flickr/Lian Chang)

Gowanus Canal

Though it's not quite beautiful -- it's one
Though it's not quite beautiful -- it's one of the most polluted bodies of water in the United States -- the Gowanus Canal is still a spot that can serve for an interesting perspective of the city. At almost two miles long, views of the city and several bridges make the Gowanus Canal a spot you might secretly enjoy. (Located in Brooklyn) (Credit: Flickr/gigi_nyc)

Berlin Wall Remnants in Paley Park

You can visit a piece of history that
You can visit a piece of history that several New Yorkers pass by every day—The Berlin Wall. Though it may just look like street art, Paley Park holds five pieces of the Berlin Wall that you can walk straight up to and capture. It's also hard to miss; these remnants stand 12 feet in height and almost double in length. (53rd Street between Madison and Fifth Avenue) (Credit: Flickr/Mark Boucher)