Go beyond the Met and the MoMa.

If you want to see tributes, collections and more of the offbeat NYC has to offer, here are the museums for you.

The Morbid Anatomy Museum

If you have a morbid curiosity about the

If you have a morbid curiosity about the "intersections of death, beauty and that which falls between the cracks," then this museum is for you. Explore the library's extensive collection of books, artworks, photographs and artifacts on such topics as anatomical art, cabinets of curiosity, natural history and the history of medicine, as well as temporary exhibitions. Currently on display through Aug. 5 is "House of Wax," which features a selection of wax models shown at the 19th-century Panopticum in Berlin that depict body parts and the effects of disease (viewer discretion is advised).

424-A Third Ave., Gowanus, 347-799-1017, morbidanatomymuseum.org

(Credit: Daniel Schvarcz )

Maritime Industry Museum

Located within SUNY Maritime College (pictured) at the

Located within SUNY Maritime College (pictured) at the historic Fort Schuyler in the Bronx, this museum is all about the country's maritime industry, past and present. Items on display include artifacts recovered from ships that sank in and around New York Harbor, navigation instruments, models of ships and passenger liners such as the Titanic, paintings and photographs.

6 Pennyfield Ave., Bronx, 718-409-7218, maritimeindustrymuseum.org

(Credit: Linda Rosier )

Museum of Food and Drink (MOFAD)

This institution opened this past fall as the

This institution opened this past fall as the world's first large-scale museum with exhibits you can eat, according to organizers. Its first show, "Flavor: Making It and Faking It," explores the food flavoring industry through scent and taste exhibits. The museum also regularly hosts events on topics like Himalayan food in Jackson Heights and even ice cream (Häagen-Dazs is an official partner).

62 Bayard St., Williamsburg, 718-387-2845, mofad.org

(Credit: Shannon Sturgis )

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City Reliquary

Williamsburg's City Reliquary looks like a regular Metropolitan

Williamsburg's City Reliquary looks like a regular Metropolitan Avenue storefront, but inside are relics of New York City's past. The museum started as a collection in Dave Herman's house at the corner of Havemayer and Grand streets. He collected subway tokens, baseball cards, seltzer bottles, Statue of Liberty figurines, a set of dentures found in Dead Horse Bay and more everyday objects that capture life in New York. By January 2006, the collection got too big and he expanded to the current location. In addition to these relics, there are also rotating themed exhibits.

340 Metropolitan Ave., Williamsburg, cityreliquary.org

(Credit: City Reliquary)

Mmuseumm

TriBeCa's Mmuseumm could be the city's tiniest museum.

TriBeCa's Mmuseumm could be the city's tiniest museum. Located in an elevator shaft between Franklin and White streets, the Mmuseumm is dedicated to artifacts of the modern age -- with perhaps its most well-known being the shoe that was thrown at President George W. Bush in Iraq in 2008. The permanent collection also includes a Saudi potato chip bag, Van Neistat's Air Conditioner Vent and a bag of Cable Car gummy worms. The Mmuseumm hopes that "by examining the small things, the vernacular, we are able to look at the big one, life itself, or at least start to see its edges," according to its website.

368 Broadway, mmuseumm.com

(Credit: Mmuseumm via Instagram)

Museum of Math

The National Museum of Math is dedicated to

The National Museum of Math is dedicated to ending the common-held notion that math cannot be fun. Known as MoMath, the museum aims to "enhance public understanding and perception of mathematics. Its dynamic and programs will stimulate inquiry, spark curiosity, and reveal the wonders of mathematics," according to its website. The 19,000-square-foot museum is heavy on interactive exhibits, including a square-wheeled trike, a logo generator, a human tree that moves and sways in response to your motion and a water frieze where you can roll patterns on the wall (for different symmetries).

11 E. 26th St., momath.org

(Credit: Museum of Math)