Celebrate Women's History Month by reflecting at one of these monuments.

Joan of Arc, Riverside Park

The Joan of Arc monument in Riverside park
The Joan of Arc monument in Riverside park was created by artist Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington and dedicated in 1915. According to the Parks Department, a group of prominent New Yorkers started a Joan of Arc monument committee in 1909, but Huntington only received an honorable mention at first by the selection jury--they were skeptical a woman could have produced this impressive design by herself. She won the commission nonetheless, and now her statue sits at top of the steps to the park at Riverside Drive and West 93rd St. (Credit: Flickr / shellysblogger)

Eleanor Roosevelt, Riverside Park

Riverside Park is also home to a monument
Riverside Park is also home to a monument dedicated to NYC-born former first lady Anna Eleanor Roosevelt. Roosevelt's monument is at the threshold of Riverside Park (the former site of a West Side Highway access ramp and the Henry Hudson monument), and was sculpted by Penelope Jencks. Quotations from Roosevelt and Adlai Stevenson are inscribed in the pavement around the statue. (Credit: Flickr / wallyg)

Gertrude Stein, Bryant Park

The feminist radical is memorialized in Bryant Park
The feminist radical is memorialized in Bryant Park with a statue showing her in her famous cross-legged position. She posed for Jo Davidson (who also sculpted the Fiorello LaGuardia bust in the Little Flower Playground on the Lower East Side) in 1920 in Paris, and was unveiled in the park in 1992. (Credit: Flickr / wallyg)

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Harriet Tubman Memorial, Harlem

The monument to abolitionist Harriet Tubman, titled
The monument to abolitionist Harriet Tubman, titled "Swing Low, Harriet Tubman," is located at West 122nd Street between St. Nicholas Avenue and Frederick Douglass Boulevard in Harlem. Designed by Alison Saar, the monument was cast and dedicated in 2007. Tubman, born a slave in Maryland, helped over 300 slaves escape, and she settled in upstate Auburn, New York after the war. (Credit: Flickr / imjustwalkin)

Frances Hodgson Burnett, Central Park

"If you look the right way, the whole world is a garden," wrote Frances Hodgson Burnett in the children's classic "The Secret Garden." With this in mind, it's only fitting that NYC's garden oasis, Central Park, has a statue dedicated to Burnett. (Credit: Flickr / roddavid)

Josephine Shaw Lowell Fountain, Bryant Park

The fountain in Bryant Park is dedicated to
The fountain in Bryant Park is dedicated to Josephine Shaw Lowell, the first woman to serve on the New York State Board of Charities. Born in Massachusetts, she primarily grew up on Staten Island and later lived there after her husband's death. She served on the Board of Charities from 1876 until 1889 and also helped form the New York Consumers' League, dedicated to improving women's wages and working conditions for women. The Bryant Park fountain was the first public monument dedicated to women in NYC. (Credit: Getty Images / Timothy A. Clary)