Mayor Bill de Blasio said Monday that his "Vision Zero" initiative to end traffic deaths and injuries is still appropriately named despite recent pedestrian fatalities.

The "rallying cry" matters in changing behavior, he said at an unrelated news conference in the Bronx.

Two men were struck and killed by vehicles in separate incidents in the city Sunday.

A 33-year-old man died in Union Square in a hit-and-run accident, and a 26-year-old man was injured by a livery cab in the Bronx and then killed when a second cab ran over him as he lay in the street, police said. The first cab stayed on the scene, but the second one sped off, police said.

Police Monday said 95 pedestrians and 17 cyclists have been killed in traffic-related incidents this year.

De Blasio reiterated the end goal of his safety initiative.

"It turns out a vast amount of this problem is one we can solve," he said. "Some of it comes down to individual behavior -- a lot of it -- and the whole message around Vision Zero and all the energy it's created and all the local discussion it's created is helping to change behavior."

The mayor cited the installation of speed cameras, including those near schools, and the lowering of the citywide default speed limit to 25 mph as some measures the city and state governments have taken.

It's "right" to call the effort "Vision Zero," because lives can be saved "on an unforeseen scale," de Blasio said.

He acknowledged that the task to end deaths is difficult, but unlike other challenges, it comes down to changing individual behavior.

The city's Vision Zero website calls the initiative a "mindset" and notes that Sweden, where the concept originated, has reduced its traffic fatalities by 30 percent since 1997.

With Alison Fox