Four years may seem far away, but there has already been talk about who the Democratic Party will nominate to run for president in 2020.

A number of lists have floated around with some realistic and some hopeful names. Recently, Vice President Joe Biden made headlines when he said he will run again in 2020 -- much to the surprise of the reporters he was speaking with.

Only time will tell how serious Biden is and who will ultimately run. But here's a look at some of the most common guesses and what they have said about a potential bid at the White House.

Joe Biden: Maybe

Vice President Joe Biden has considered a run

Vice President Joe Biden has considered a run for the White House for many years. He was unsuccessful in 1988 and 2008, and he decided not to run in 2016, primarily because of the death of his oldest son in 2015.

Will he run in 2020?: "I'm not committing not to run," he told reporters on Dec. 5, 2016. "I'm not committing to anything. I learned a long time ago, fate has a strange way of intervening."

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Robyn Beck)

Bernie Sanders: Maybe

Sen. Bernie Sanders may have lost the Democratic

Sen. Bernie Sanders may have lost the Democratic nomination this year, but he hasn't ruled out another run. Some of his supporters are already planning for it -- signs reading "Bernie 2020" were held up at a rally in Washington, D.C., after Trump's victory.

Will he run in 2020?: "Four years is a long time from now," he said after the 2016 election. "We'll take one thing at a time, but I'm not ruling out anything."

(Credit: Getty Images / Nicholas Kamm)

Michelle Obama: Not happening

Talk of first lady Michelle Obama running for

Talk of first lady Michelle Obama running for president increased after her powerful DNC speech in July, but she and the president have said multiple times she is not interested in being president.

Will she run in 2020?: "I will not run for president," she said at South by Southwest on March 16, 2016. "No, nope, not going to do it."

And if that isn't enough, President Barack Obama said in January, "There are three things that are certain in life: death, taxes and Michelle is not running for president. That, I can tell you."

(Credit: Getty Images / Jessica Kourkounis)

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISE HERE

Andrew Cuomo: More likely

Some political experts say New York Gov. Andrew

Some political experts say New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has had his eye on the White House for some time, but his relationship with the Clintons stopped him from running in 2016. The governor hasn't said publicly if he is planning to run in 2020, but strategists predict that he is considering it.

Will he run in 2020?: "I see a role for myself as governor of the state of New York,'' he said when asked what national role he sees for himself after the presidential election. But he's also not putting down the rumors that he wants to run.

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Kena Betancur)

Cory Booker: Maybe

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker's speech at the

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker's speech at the Democratic National Convention in July spurred talk of him making a future run for the White House. Booker has said he doesn't want to be president in the past, but many pundits still consider him a likely contender.

Will he run in 2020?: "The dust hasn't even settled from the 2016 election -- the absolute last thing on my mind is the next one," Booker said after the election. "My focus is on the immediate priorities of working to unite our country."

(Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Robyn Beck)

Elizabeth Warren: Probably not

Many people on Twitter immediately started talking about

Many people on Twitter immediately started talking about Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren running for president after Donald Trump's victory in November. Warren passed on running for the top office in 2016, and has said she does not regret that decision. While things could change in the next few years, Warren has been pretty adamant about not running.

Will she run in 2020?: "I'm not running and I'm not going to run," she said in 2015.

(Credit: Getty Images / Paul Zimmerman)