Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were the projected winners of Tuesday's New York State primaries, according to multiple media reports.

Republican Trump's huge victory in his home state pushed him closer to capturing the 1,237 delegates needed to win his party's presidential nomination and avoiding a contested national convention in July.

Clinton's dominating double-digit win in New York, which she once represented in the U.S. Senate, snapped a winning streak by Democratic rival Bernie Sanders and made it nearly impossible for Sanders to overtake her commanding lead in the delegates needed to win the nomination.

Trump was projected to have won the New York Republican primary moments after the polls closed at 9 p.m. "Thank you New York! I love you!" he tweeted.

The Republican front-runner spoke from Trump Tower in midtown Manhattan following his victory, telling the crowd, "I can think of nowhere that I would rather have this victory." He added that his Republican opponent Ted Cruz "is just about mathematically eliminated" following Trump's New York win.

"We don't have much of a race anymore based on what I'm seeing on television," Trump said. "We are really, really rocking."

Clinton was projected to be the winner of the Democratic primary shortly after 9:30 p.m.

"Thank you, New York. You put your faith in me 16 years ago and again tonight. I'll never stop fighting for you," she tweeted.

She added in a second tweet, "To our volunteers, organizers, and supporters who worked your hearts out in New York: This is your win. Thank you."

Clinton took the stage at the Sheraton Times Square Hotel after 10 p.m. on Tuesday and told the crowd that "there's no place like home."

She added that "victory is in sight" for her following her win in New York.

Tuesday's primary was plagued with more voter complaints than in recent memory, state officials said. The state attorney general’s office said it has fielded more complaints Tuesday on its “voter hotline” than in recent memory.

By 4 p.m., the office received 562 phone calls and 140 emails with complaints from voters across New York, according to Nick Benson, spokesman for Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman. Benson said this compares to just 150 total complaints for the 2012 general election.

“The most common complaint has been from individuals who attempted to vote but were told that they are not registered to vote whatsoever,” Benson said. “The second most common complaint has been from individuals who are registered, but have been informed that they are not registered with a particular political party and may not participate in the partisan primary of their choice.”

A number of people not registered with either party were showing up attempting to cast ballots, election officials said, though they had no number for how many were turned away. New York’s primaries are open only to party members, and registered voters who wanted to switch parties had to do so back in October.

Comptroller Scott Stringer said on Tuesday that his office will audit the Board of Elections after the BOE deregistered more than 125,000 Brooklyn Democratic voters before primary day.

Bernie Sanders sounded off Tuesday on the voting issues while at a rally in State College, Pennsylvania. "It is absurd that in Brooklyn, New York, where I was born actually, tens of thousands of people as I understand it have been purged from the voting rolls," he said.