Nearly 75 percent of guns used to commit crimes and recovered by New York State law enforcement come from out of state, according to a new report by the state’s attorney general’s office.

The study, released Tuesday, also found that close to 90 percent of all handguns used in crimes and recovered in New York — the weapon of choice for violent criminals — originate in other states, Attorney General Eric T. Schneiderman’s office said in a Tuesday news release.

The report, “Target on Trafficking,” and an accompanying interactive Web tool show how New York’s strong gun laws are undermined by lax laws in “iron pipeline” states, the release said.

The iron pipeline states are identified as those with lax guns laws along the I-95 corridor and include Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, the release said.

Schneiderman called the report a first-of-its-kind analysis of tens of thousands of “crime guns” recovered by law enforcement.

The report traces the purchase history of 52,915 firearms recovered by New York State law enforcement between 2010 and 2015.

“The data makes one thing abundantly clear: New York’s strong gun laws are being undermined at every turn by lax laws in other states,” Schneiderman said. “. . . the illegal guns most often used in violent crimes continue to pour into our state.”

The analysis shows that 74 percent of all crime guns recovered by law enforcement originated out of state. And nearly nine out of 10 handguns — 86 percent — come from out of state.

The report defined a crime gun is any gun connected to a crime that is recovered by law enforcement.

“The data makes one thing abundantly clear: New York’s strong gun laws are being undermined at every turn by lax laws in other states,” Schneiderman said. “. . . the illegal guns most often used in violent crimes continue to pour into our state.”

New York City Police Commissioner James O’Neill said one of his department’s biggest challenges is “guns, and in particular handguns, that are trafficked into New York from out of state.”

O’Neill said the report provides “invaluable insight into where these guns come from and how law enforcement and lawmakers can act to protect New Yorkers.”