An attacker drove a truck into a crowd of people celebrating Bastille Day in Nice, France, on Thursday night. Officials say that more than 80 people have died. 

The driver of the truck was killed by police, officials said.

Here's what we know about the attack so far.

The attack

The attack occurred on the seafront Promenade des Anglais in Nice, France, shortly after 10:30 p.m. on July 14, 2016. People were gathered to watch fireworks for Bastille Day, a French holiday marking the anniversary of the Storming of the Bastille, a major part of the French Revolution.

The attacker drove a large truck into the crowd for 1.5 miles. Officials said he also opened fire before he was shot by police.

The attack killed at least 84 people, officials said. At least 10 children were killed in the attack and 25 of the injured were on life support, authorities said on Friday. 

Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack on Saturday, a news agency supporting the group said. 

"The person who carried out the operation in Nice, France, to run down people was one of the soldiers of Islamic State. He carried out the operation in response to calls to target nationals of states that are part of the coalition fighting Islamic State," the statement said.

The driver

The driver was identified as Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, 31, a Tunisian-born Frenchman. A police source told Reuters that he was not on the French intelligence watch list, but he was known to be connected to some common crimes. He radicalized recently and quickly, according to France's prime minister.

The victims

Victims of the attack were local residents, tourists, adults and children. Hollande said many of the victims were foreigners and children. Two United States citizens are reportedly among the victims --- Texas resident Sean Copeland, 51, and his son Brodie, 11, who were in Nice for a family vacation, a friend told a local newspaper.

The 'new normal'

This is the third major terror attack in France in the last two years. On Nov. 13, 2015, 130 people were killed in a series of shootings and bombings. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attacks the next day. The French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo was also attacked on Jan. 7, 2015, by two shooters who identified themselves as part of a branch of al-Qaeda.

No terrorist group has claimed responsibility for the attack in Nice, but officials have said the country must face the consistent threat of terror.

"We have moved into a new era," said Prime Minister Manuel Valls. "And France will have to live with terrorism."

Belgian Prime Minister Charles Michel echoed his words, saying “zero risk does not exist.” Belgium was the target of a terror attack in March that killed 32 people and injured more than 300.