The Landmarks Preservation Commission will hold a public hearing on June 23 about whether to grant landmark status to The Stonewall Inn, the bar that was the scene of a 1969 uprising against a police raid sparked a civil rights challenge to the mistreatment of homosexuals in the U.S.

The Landmarks Commission voted Tuesday to hold the public hearing, the first step in the landmarking process. The Stonewall Inn is already inside the Greenwich Village Historic District, which was designated only a few months before the uprising and does not include the rebellion in its official landmark record. 

The designation of the Stonewall Inn as an individual landmark would be to specifically commemorate the importance of the bar to LGBT history, the LPC said. 

Andrew Berman, executive director of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation, called the move by the LPC "long-overdue." 

"It is critical that the history of sites like Stonewall and the immeasurably important role they played in making our country a more just, open, and accepting place, is recognized and preserved," Berman said in a statement. 

He said this would be the first time that the city has considered bestowing landmark status "based solely upon its LGBT history."