Jared Kushner has been appointed as a senior adviser to the president, Donald Trump's transition team announced in January.

The appointment raised questions about anti-nepotism laws, as Kushner is married to Trump's eldest daughter, Ivanka Trump. The Department of Justice, however, said in a letter dated Jan. 20, 2017 — the same day Trump was inaugurated — that Kushner's appointment does not break any anti-nepotism laws.

Kushner was a close adviser to Trump throughout his campaign, and his involvement has been credited as being one of the major reasons Trump won the election.

A Nov. 22 feature on the real estate developer in Forbes suggests that, without Kushner, Trump may not have won.

“Jared Kushner is the biggest surprise of the 2016 election,” Eric Schmidt, former CEO of Google, told the magazine. “Best I can tell, he actually ran the campaign and did it with essentially no resources.”

Here are seven more things to know about the president's son-in-law.

His grandparents were Holocaust survivors

Kushner's grandfather and grandmother were Holocaust survivors, and
Kushner's grandfather and grandmother were Holocaust survivors, and he grew up in an Orthodox Jewish household. He attended the private, yeshiva high school Fisch School in Paramus, N.J. Before Kushner and Ivanka Trump married, Ivanka converted to Judaism. (Credit: Getty Images for FINCA / Joe Corrigan)

He attended Harvard and NYU

Kushner graduated from Harvard College in 2003 with

Kushner graduated from Harvard College in 2003 with a degree in sociology. His acceptance has been linked to a donation that his father gave to the college, according to the book "The Price of Admission: How America's Ruling Class Buys Its Way into Elite Colleges -- and Who Gets Left Outside the Gates" by Daniel Golden.

Golden says Kushner's father, a New York University alumnus, pledged $2.5 million to Harvard in 1998. "At the time of the pledge, Kushner's older son, Jared, was starting the college admissions process of the Frisch School," he wrote. " 'There was no way anybody in the administration office of the school thought he would on the merits get into Harvard,' a former school official told me. 'His GPA did not warrant it, his SAT scores did not warrant it.' "

Kushner later graduated NYU in 2007, earning an MBA and a law degree.

(Credit: Getty Images / Chip Somodevilla)

His father went to prison in 2005

Kushner's father, Charles Kushner -- who at the
Kushner's father, Charles Kushner -- who at the time was running the family's real estate company, Kushner Properties -- was arrested and charged with tax evasion, illegal campaign donations and witness tampering in 2004. He was convicted of those charges and sentenced to two years in prison in 2005. A U.S. attorney at the time, Chris Christie negotiated the plea deal with Kushner. (Credit: Getty Images / Spencer Platt)

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He became CEO of his family’s company in 2008

Three years after his father went to prison,
Three years after his father went to prison, Jared Kushner took over the family company, becoming chief executive in 2008. He is credited for expanding the company's presence in New York City, as it was primarily a New Jersey real estate company. One of his first decisions was to purchase 666 Fifth Ave. for a record-breaking $1.8 billion. (Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Kena Betancur)

Kusher has 3 young children

Kushner and Ivanka Trump have three young children
Kushner and Ivanka Trump have three young children together - Arabella Rose, Joseph Federick (not pictured) and Theodore James. (Credit: AFP / Mandel Ngan / Getty Images)

He was the publisher of the New York Observer

Kushner purchased the New York Observer for $10 million

Kushner purchased the New York Observer for $10 million in 2006. He was 25 at the time. Kushner said he used the money he had earned from closing deals on residential buildings in Cambridge while he was at Harvard.

During the Republican primaries, the newspaper endorsed Trump, which led to questions of a conflict of interest. The paper did not endorse any candidate ahead of the general election.

After being named as a senior adviser to the president, Kusher said he would transfer the publication to a family trust, with chairman and CEO -- and Kusher's brother-in-law -- Joseph Meyer taking over the as publisher. (Credit: Getty Images / Peter Kramer)

Role on the Trump campaign

Kushner, who doesn't talk to the press often,

Kushner, who doesn't talk to the press often, had a quiet, but increasingly important role on the Trump campaign. He "helped recruit a sorely needed director of communications, oversaw the creation of an online fundraising system and has had a hand in drafting Mr. Trump's few policy speeches," The New York Times reported in July.

Kushner reached out to contacts in Silicon Valley to learn how to use Facebook microtargeting for fundraising and getting Trump's message to the right people. With Kushner's new technique in place the campaign went from selling $8,000 of merchandise a day to $80,000 a day, according to a Forbes article. "In another test, Kushner spent $160,000 to promote a series of low-tech policy videos of Trump talking straight into the camera that collectively generated more than 74 million views," the article says.

(Credit: Getty Images / Mandel Ngan)

He has defended Trump’s rhetoric

Despite Trump's insulting comments about Muslims, Mexicans, women
Despite Trump's insulting comments about Muslims, Mexicans, women and others, Kushner insists he knows the real Trump. "I just know a lot of the things that people try to attack him with are just not true or overblown or exaggerations. I know his character. I know who he is, and I obviously would not have supported him if I thought otherwise. If the country gives him a chance, they'll find he won't tolerate hateful rhetoric or behavior," Kushner told Forbes. (Credit: Getty Images / Spencer Platt)

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Kusher is solidly in Trump's inner circle

As senior adviser to the president, Kushner is
As senior adviser to the president, Kushner is expected to have unfettered access to Trump. Add to that his son-in-law status and he could be among the most powerful people in the West Wing. (Credit: AFP/Getty Images / Win McNamee)