Thousands of protesters assembled for President Donald Trump’s homecoming Thursday as dozens of civil rights, immigration and women’s advocacy groups mobilized opponents.

Hours before Trump arrived in New York, demonstrators gathered on Manhattan's West Side, near the Intrepid aircraft carrier that now holds the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum, where the president dined with Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull. Some demonstrators banged pots, while others carried anti-Trump signs.

Unlike the more recent protests, such as the March for Science and the NYC Tax March, which focused on specific issues or causes near and dear to New Yorkers' hearts, Thursday's demonstrations were more overarching in nature.

So why are New Yorkers protesting? Scroll down to find out.

"People coming to our country are not trying to take our jobs."

Michael Dominic, 46, a documentary filmmaker from Jackson

Michael Dominic, 46, a documentary filmmaker from Jackson Heights, said he cares most about Trump's immigration policies.

"It's what this country is and what it was founded on: When people are in need, you welcome them. You don't shut them out. That's a mean, selfish stance," he said.

"People coming to our country are not trying to take our jobs. They're trying to find a better life," he added.

(Credit: amNewYork/ Vincent Barone)

"I'm worried and I've been fighting since Jan. 20."

Caleb Hart, 67, emigrated from Jamaica and lives
Caleb Hart, 67, emigrated from Jamaica and lives in Hackensack, N.J. He was protesting at 54th Street and Fifth Avenue, where the NY Immigration Coalition was staging a rally. "We are the most generous nation," he said. "But we are losing those values of empathy, kindness and mercy. That's why I'm here. I'm worried and I've been fighting since Jan. 20." (Credit: amNewYork / Vin Barone)

"This is not the country I volunteered to fight for."

Drew Pham, 29, of Brooklyn, was at De

Drew Pham, 29, of Brooklyn, was at De Witt Clinton Park in Manhattan, protesting plans to build a wall along the Mexican border and the travel ban, which he called a "Muslim ban." Pham enlisted with the Army in 2009 and was deployed to Afghanistan in 2010.

"This is not the country I volunteered to fight for," he said.

(Credit: Newsday / David Schwartz)

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"People need to laugh."

"People need to laugh. They're terrified," said Marni Halasa, 51, of Manhattan's West Side, dressed as Miss Mar-a-Lago while protesting at De Witt Clinton Park in Manhattan on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Credit: Newsday / David Schwartz)

"Keep jobs in America!"

Asa Lowe, 45, of Coney Island, Brooklyn, was

Asa Lowe, 45, of Coney Island, Brooklyn, was one of a handful of Trump supporters at West 44th Street and 12th Avenue.

"Why are we sending our jobs overseas?" he said. "NAFTA is wrong. Keep jobs in America! He's gonna end NAFTA. There ain't gonna be no jobs going overseas. That's it."

(Credit: Newsday / Matthew Chayes)

"Every time he opens his mouth, the registers ring."

Dinetta Gilmore, of Brookyln, was selling anti-Trump buttons

Dinetta Gilmore, of Brookyln, was selling anti-Trump buttons for $2 and "Resist Trump" flags for $5 on the corner of West 44th Street and 12th Avenue. She makes them in her apartment.

"Anything to do with this guy, business is going to be good," she said. "Every time he opens his mouth, we get to make a new button. Every time he opens his mouth, the registers ring."

(Credit: Newsday / Matthew Chayes)

"He's not my president."

Melvyn Stevens, 74, a geriatric nurse from Greenwich

Melvyn Stevens, 74, a geriatric nurse from Greenwich Village, explains the elaborate costume he made more than a month ago: "This guy on the top is Bannon and he's pulling the strings for Trump."

Stevens said he wanted to make Trump know he didn't win the popular vote.

"As far as I'm concerned, he's not my president, and I want to see him impeached. I hope he sees this from the boat," he said.

(Credit: Newsday / Matthew Chayes)

"He's not going to change us."

"We need accountability and transparency," said Norbert Sinski, 74, a clinical social worker and Catholic priest from Manhattan's Lower East Side.

"We've had it with every other president. It's basically the theme, follow the money . . . We may not change a lot of things but he's not going to change us."

(Credit: Newsday / Matthew Chayes)

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"He doesn't represent this city."

"He doesn't represent this city," said Steve McCasland, 30 of Queens, during a protest against President Donald Trump's visit to NYC on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Credit: Newsday / David Schwartz)

"... not for Trump"

Marilee Lawrence, 47, of Standing Rock, North Dakota,
Marilee Lawrence, 47, of Standing Rock, North Dakota, brought her 8-year-old grandson to be a part of the protest at De Witt Clinton Park in Manhattan on Thursday, May 4, 2017. She said she is Native American and "not for Trump because of some of the things he's doing to affect native people." (Credit: Newsday / Matthew Chayes)

"Trump will change the USA!"

Diane Atkins, of Brooklyn, argued with Trump foes

Diane Atkins, of Brooklyn, argued with Trump foes protesting across from the Intrepid.

"Trump will change the USA!" she said.

(Credit: Newsday / Matthew Chayes)

"I just can't abide the con man."

"I just can't abide the con man in the White House," said Bob Ondericek, 75, a retired computer programmer from Manhattan, on Thursday, May 4, 2017. (Credit: Newsday / David Schwartz)