U.S. Sen Charles Schumer wants the federal government to overhaul its screening procedures and protocols when it comes to auto safety.

Schumer said the recent recall of Takata air bags demonstrates that the U.S. Department of Transportation needs to rethink the way it inspect car devices in the first place. Currently manufacturers self certify those components and they don't have the best standards when it comes to safety, according to the senator.

"It's clear the current system of testing car safety is not working," he said in a statement Sunday.

Eleven car companies recalled 14 million Takata air bags after it was revealed the inflaters in the them ruptured and caused metal shrapnel to fly out. Schumer said the company knew about the problem in 2004 and it took a decade before the federal government took action.

Although the U.S. transportation department't inspector general is working to speed up the recall, the senator said the agency's best solution would be a top-to-bottom review of its auto safety screening process. He called on the inspector general to create a set of recommendations that identify "flawed and dangerous parts in the product development and prototyping phase," before the devices become available to the public.