Airlines should not reduce the maximum allowable size for carry-on bags, which would require passengers to check their now-regulation luggage carry-ons and invest in brand-new luggage, Sen. Charles Schumer said yesterday.

Last week, the International Air Transport Association proposed a "guideline" for unchecked luggage of 21.5 inches by 13.5 inches by 7.5 inches to "make the best use of storage space" especially when flights are full.

Currently, most major airlines permit carry-on bags that measure 22 inches by 14 inches by 9 inches, "the size you've seen millions of people rolling around at airports and train stations when you travel," Schumer said.

"Enough already!" said the senator, noting that eight international airlines -- including Lufthansa, Emirates and Air China -- have agreed to adopt the new standards and 40 other airlines have expressed support for them.

A proposal to reduce the size of carry-on bags "comes at a time when projected airline industry profits are set to reach an all-time high of $30 billion in 2015," and passengers are being gouged on fees for everything from leg room to peanuts, said Schumer.

Noting that personal appeals to airline CEOs in 2010 prompted carriers to scrap plans to charge for carry ons, Schumer said he is hoping to squash the latest proposals with similar pressure.