I’m a devoted disciple of the world of online shopping. A trip to a busy shopping mall has rarely resulted in retail “therapy” for me — more often than not it concludes with frustrated exhaustion and disappointment. Online retailer Everlane, however, has stepped in with an appealing middle ground in the form of Shoe Park.

The newly opened pop-up shop on Wooster Street in SoHo encourages customers to deposit their kicks at the door and pad around its temporary space, where footwear from its online collection is on display in every size to try on and test drive (priced $135 to $235).

The new space was the brainchild of the company and set designer Robert Storey, known for his imaginative spatial designs for shops, window storefronts and runway shows, including for Nicholas Kirkwood and Hermès.

Everlane’s Alyssa Bergerson explained to amNewYork that the brand was eager to work with Storey because of “his keen ability to transform space and create immersive environments.” The result is a “park” composed of more than 500 plants and 195 pairs of shoes.

Eight shoe styles are displayed in every size option, which means those of us who like to neurotically try on a size 7, then a 7.5, followed by a 6.5 and then the 7 again (just to be sure!) can do so without waiting for a sales associate to venture to and from the storage room over and over again.

The space also features a lounge area, where shoppers can sip on the offerings of Blue Bottle Coffee, which has set up a pop-up within the pop-up. Glossier’s cult lip balms are also at hand, adding to Shoe Park’s comforting vibe.

As per Everlane’s mission to produce high-end products with transparent manufacturing and direct-to-consumer costs, all of the shoes available for sale are made at the company’s Brescia factory in northern Italy.

You can visit Everlane’s website to see photographs of the factory and learn more about the production process.

The styles on show are not only on-trend for fall — they’re also all very walkable designs, perfect for the New Yorker with places to go.

The space goes to show that even the flustered can have a Zen experience at the shops.