Long Island City was once its very own city, until the consolidation of New York City in 1898. Today LIC is known for a cutting edge art and design scene that’s coupled with a rapid growth in residential and corporate properties. However, everywhere you turn in this waterfront community you'll find bold remainders of the area’s once industrial past.

Spend the day museum hopping at the Museum of Modern Art’s avant-garde offshoot MoMA PS1, the Museum of the Moving Image, and the niche Noguchi Museum. Explore sculpture parks and actual parks, and toss in a couple of delicious meals (hello, Brazilian lunch). Here’s how to do LIC with a little savoir-faire.

Wake up at Sweetleaf

The original Sweetleaf, which opened in 2008, is

The original Sweetleaf, which opened in 2008, is the optimal spot to start your day. Espresso drinks are the star of the coffee counter, with classics poured out excellently. There's also the signature Voodoo Child (pictured) -- a chilled, Vietnamese-style cold brew. Pair with any bakery pick. (10-93 Jackson Ave., 917-832-6726)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)

Explore art outdoors at Socrates Sculpture Park

Until 1986, the plot of land that is

Until 1986, the plot of land that is now Socrates Sculpture Park was an abandoned landfill along the East River. It was then that a group of artists transformed the area into the internationally renowned outdoor exhibit space it is today. Displays change -- see "G.O.A.T., again" (pictured) through Sept. 4 -- but all make use of the outdoors and its juxtaposition to art. (32-01 Vernon Blvd., 718-956-1819)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)

Go back to school via MoMA PS1

Founded in 1971, MoMA PS1 is housed in

Founded in 1971, MoMA PS1 is housed in a former school building that was built in the late 19th century. Its original mission was to create a space purely for contemporary art in a non-traditional space -- something it continues to do even since its affiliation with the Museum of Modern Art began in 2000. Exhibitions push boundaries, with a strong focus on work that's highly experimental in form. Walking through the halls and into the former classrooms makes for an incomparable museum experience. (22-25 Jackson Ave., 718-784-2084)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)

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Grab a Brazilian lunch at Beija Flor

Shift gears for a Brazilian lunch at Beija

Shift gears for a Brazilian lunch at Beija Flor. Rustic interiors set the mood for a menu of lively flavors. Lunch specials include sandwich options or larger plates like the frango grelhado (chicken with yucca and collards) or the filé de peixe (swai fish with tomatoes and onions). (Pictured: The seafood stew entree, with swai fish and shrimp in coconut milk.) Don't forget to order a Brazilian beer or a caipirinha, Brazil's national cocktail. (38-02 29th St., 718-606-2468)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)

Glimpse 6 decades of work at the Noguchi Museum

Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi designed and built the

Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi designed and built the Noguchi Museum to serve as a place to house his work. With a career of nearly six decades, and work spanning everything from sculpture to landscape architecture, Noguchi left a definitive mark. Though his work can be found around the world, the museum offers an unrivaled, intimate look at his unique form. (9-01 33rd Rd, 718-204-7088)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)

Move through LIC's past at Gantry State Park

Take a breather at Gantry State Park in

Take a breather at Gantry State Park in LIC's Hunters Point. Located in a former dockyard, the waterfront stretch of parkland still contains remnants of its manufacturing district past. This includes the northern portion which was a former Pepsi bottling plant, where a large landmark Pepsi-Cola sign can still be found. (4-09 47th Rd.,718-786-6385)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)

Dine (and drink) seasonally at LIC Market

Opened by a Queens native, LIC Market maintains

Opened by a Queens native, LIC Market maintains strong relationships with local farmers and purveyors to make sure that the menu is true to the seasonal American mantra. The humbly decorated space recalls a more country setting than the modern design high rises that surround it. Try the burger and add foie gras (for $15 more) along with any of the natural wine selections. (21-52 44th Dr., 718-361-0013)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)

Celebrate media at The Museum of the Moving Image

The Museum of the Moving Image is dedicated

The Museum of the Moving Image is dedicated to the curation of all things media and claims to be the only museum of its kind in the United States. The permanent "Behind the Screen" exhibition documents moving media from early film to the digital era of today. There is also a changing list of screenings with afternoon showtimes, should you want to sit down for a flick. And on July 22, the much-anticipated Jim Henson Exhibition launches. (36-01 35th Ave., 718-784-0077)

(Credit: Esto / Museum of the Moving Image / Peter Aaron)

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Choose from 40+ wines by the glass at Domaine Bar a Vins

A day both outdoors and indoors, and full

A day both outdoors and indoors, and full of art and city views, means a nightcap is of utmost importance. Winos are on the return to Domaine Bar a Vins, located conveniently off the 7 Train --- and for good reason. With over 40 wines by the glass, choosing what to sip may prove difficult. Which means only one thing: You need not limit yourself to one glass. (50-04 Vernon Blvd., 718-784-2350)

(Credit: Linda Rosier)