An interactive cube installation in Brooklyn and a tree sculpture that seems to materialize before your eyes are just some of the public exhibits that have sprouted up around the city.

The Department of Transportation’s Art Program celebrated spring this year by introducing new sculptures, interactive projects and painted works in Queens, Brooklyn, Manhattan and the Bronx — sorry, Staten Island.

The new artworks will be on display for the next 11 months, according to the DOT Art Program, so you have plenty of time to plan an outing to see them for yourself.

Kingsbridge, the Bronx: ‘Rhythmic Color’

Spice up your next stroll in the Bronx
Spice up your next stroll in the Bronx by climbing these colorful steps on Naples Terrace, near Godwin Terrace in Kingsbridge. The "Rhythmic Color" mural was created by volunteers with Publicolor, a youth development and mentoring program that helps high-risk students as they prepare for college or a career. The steps were painted using four colors in two contrasting directions in order to "represent musical rhythm and movement," per the DOT Art Program. (Credit: New York City Department of Transportation)

Clinton Hill, Brooklyn: ‘Exquisite Corpse’

If you're a hands-on kind of art appreciator,
If you're a hands-on kind of art appreciator, then Fanny Allié's interactive sculpture should be on your summer bucket list. Located in Putnam Plaza at Fulton Street and Grand Avenue in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn, each cube of the sculpture can shift, creating a new photomontage portrait every time someone comes along and interacts with it. The black and white portraits on each cube are of people who have lived in the neighborhood for more than 25 years. The sculpture, which was installed in collaboration with A.I.R Gallery and Fulton Area Business Alliance, will feature four new resident portraits every three months. (Credit: New York City Department of Transportation)

Inwood, Manhattan: ‘Common Demoninator’

Environmentally friendly folk in the city will get
Environmentally friendly folk in the city will get a kick out of "Common Demoninator" in Inwood, Manhattan. The Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and artist Anthony Heinz May recently installed a 9-foot-tall cherry tree at the intersection of Dyckman Street and Riverside Drive. The sculpture is made out of upcycled materials and seeks to highlight the importance of appreciating nature in a tech-focused, urban environment. (Credit: New York City Department of Transportation)

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Long Island City, Queens: ‘The Five Elements’

The DOT Art Program teamed up with New
The DOT Art Program teamed up with New York Cares to bring a barrier beautification project to life this past Earth Day. About 70 volunteers helped Ecuadorean illustrator Carla Torres in bringing "The Five Elements" design to life along a Queens Boulevard pedestrian walkway between Jackson and Skillman avenues. The 1,000-foot-long pattern features abstract reincarnations of the five elements: earth, fire, water, air and ether-spirit. (Credit: New York City Department of Transportation)

Long Island City, Queens: ‘We Are All Tourists’

Appreciate an art gallery vibe on the streets
Appreciate an art gallery vibe on the streets of Long Island City by visiting "We Are All Tourists." Artist Cristian Pietrapiana's detailed line drawings tell the stories of tourists or travelers who have come through New York City over the past 600 years. The six panels can be found along Vernon Boulevard at Queens Plaza. (Credit: New York City Department of Transportation)