One of Mayor Bill de Blasio's marquee policy initiatives is reducing the number of traffic-related deaths to zero. 

But an analysis of data from September to December 2014 compared to the same period in 2012 found mixed results since the intiative was launched in July of last year, the Daily News reported on Tuesday. The News zeroed in on 12 major thoroughfares targeted under de Blasio's so-called "Vision Zero" plan. 

The News found that while some roads saw "huge drops in the number of wrecks that resulted in an injury or fatality," about half of the roads saw an increase. On East Gun Hill Road in the Bronx, for instance, 50 people were killed compared to 33 during the same time period. 

De Blasio told the News in a statement that the plan was working. "Last year was the safest year for pedestrians since 1910," he said. "And so far, this year is shaping up to be even safer. Nothing in New York City happens overnight, but the progress we're seeing is strong." 

The News echoed de Blasio's assessment, saying that traffic deaths had decreased this year compared with data over the last two years, with 84 as of Monday. 

The Department of Transportation said there wasn't enough data on the street-safety effort to completely analyze its effectiveness.

"Almost all fatal crashes are caused by the choices people make, which is why we look at trends that have established themselves over the course of several years," said Juan Martinez, the DOT's director of strategic initiatives, in a statement to amNewYork. "Vision Zero focuses enforcement on the leading causes of fatal crashes, and our safety street redesigns are focused on the intersections and corridors with the highest rate of pedestrian fatal and serious injuries."