“Some New Yorkers are afflicted with the disease of not waiting ‘til people leave before they enter … that’s just the nature of New Yorkers.”

--MTA CEO and Chairman Thomas Prendergast, Dec. 17, 2014.
 
The best video by three white guys from Brooklyn since the Beastie Boys is a PSA about people who stand in front of the train car doors blocking the flow of riders.

The video--“Subway Etiquette – Let People Off Before You Get On,” from Mike Rizzo and Brian Bonz, under the name Bobo Touch, with a friend, Rich Varroney—is a synthesizer-laced art-school rap about the bad train behavior passengers face daily.

“Especially when you’re feeling groggy in the morning or even after work, you see people being very aggressive, not letting people on or off the train, or giving up seats,” said Bonz, 28, a musician and composer. “And it happens on almost every line.”

The 95th Street station in their native Bay Ridge was the backdrop, inspired by Michael Jackson, who filmed “Bad” at the Hoyt-Schermerhorn station in Brooklyn. For the grainy look, the recording had been filtered and processed through a VHS deck, said Rizzo, a film and TV editor.

“We just wanted to really make it over-the-top ‘80s, like from the start,” said Rizzo, 30, a TV and film editor.

The song had been written for months before the MTA had started its new etiquette campaign to combat manspreading, finger-nail clipping, and people who make pregnant women and the elderly stand—an effort they appreciate.

“We always wanted to do it, but the campaign I think definitely pushed us further,” Rizzo said.