Pop-Tarts Café debuts with pizza, tacos and more in Times Square

If you’ve ever wanted a Pop-Tart burrito, now’s your chance.

A cafe devoted to the toaster pastries popped up like, well, a Pop-Tart overnight in the space that’s normally the Kellogg’s Café in Times Square. For this week only, it’s been dubbed the Pop-Tart Café, offering a lengthy menu of about two dozen no-toaster-necessary, very sweet treats.

“We wanted to do stuff that really just turned Pop-Tarts on its head and did really unexpected things with Pop-Tarts,” said Sandra Di Capua, a partner in the Kellogg’s Café who helped create the menu. “We wanted to bring things that were really fun and playful and the foods of our generation.”

The menu takes the kind of food you might enjoy during a night out at a bar — nachos, burritos, chili fries, pizza — and replaces the ingredients with Pop-Tarts. The Chili Pop-Tarts Fries ($8) are Chocolate Chip Pop-Tarts in the shape of fries, with crumbled Cookies & Creme Pop-Tarts substituting for ground beef (a role reprised in the tacos), orange frosting as cheese and sour sticks as scallions. The burritos feature chopped Pop-Tarts mingling with ingredients like fresh fruits, chocolate or caramel inside a crepe that’s made-to-order and folded like a burrito.

There are more obvious concoctions in the dessert category: milkshakes made with blended Pop-Tarts, cheesecakes with Pop-Tart crusts, and two takes on tiramisu made with two coffee-flavored Pop-Tarts created with Dunkin’ Donuts: Frosted Chocolate Mocha and Frosted Vanilla Latte.

“Our kitchen here, we don’t have an oven, we don’t have a stove and we really wanted to challenge ourselves to do recipes and to do dishes and desserts that we could execute in our kitchen and that would work really well,” Di Capua said. “We did a lot of research on things like no-bake cheesecakes and crusts and things like that tiramisu and trying to adapt them. And once you have the basics of that down, the world really opens up.”

The menu was a hit with Ross Eagle, 13, and Kim Eagle, 8, who made a trip into the city from Armonk, in Westchester County, with their mother, Julie Eagle, 49.

“I’ve loved Pop-Tarts basically my whole life — you could say my whole life. I’m not that old, but still,” Ross said. “And I just thought they made it into food. I mean it’s already food, but they changed it to make it more involved in the actual food community instead of just being a snack.”

Here’s a look at what’s on the menu.

Jillian Jorgensen