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Buhmann on Art: Jack Tworkov

 “View of Bay, Provincetown” (1931). Oil on canvas, 20.13h x 30.06w in (51.1h x 76.4w cm). Courtesy Alexander Gray Assoc., NY | ©2015 Jack Tworkov/Licensed by VAGA, NY, NY.
“View of Bay, Provincetown” (1931). Oil on canvas, 20.13h x 30.06w in (51.1h x 76.4w cm). Courtesy Alexander Gray Assoc., NY | ©2015 Jack Tworkov/Licensed by VAGA, NY, NY.

BY STEPHANIE BUHMANN | A founding member of the New York School’s famous Eighth Street Club — which included artists such as Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Ad Reinhardt — Jack Tworkov (1900-1982) was a prominent and important figure of the post-war New York art scene.

Installation shot from “Jack Tworkov: Mark and Grid, 1931–1982.” Courtesy Alexander Gray Associates.
Installation shot from “Jack Tworkov: Mark and Grid, 1931–1982.” Courtesy Alexander Gray Associates.

Though at the forefront of Abstract Expressionism, he was also among the first artists to question the movement’s commodification later on. Like all his peers, Tworkov’s first artistic influences were rooted in European art — especially the work of Cezanne, who inspired him to shift his focus from literature to painting. While references to European artists can easily be seen in his work until 1948, Tworkov found his unique voice soon after.

“Departure” (1951). Oil on canvas, 45h x 42w in (114.3h x 106.7w cm). Courtesy Alexander Gray Assoc., NY | ©2015 Jack Tworkov/Licensed by VAGA, NY, NY.
“Departure” (1951). Oil on canvas, 45h x 42w in (114.3h x 106.7w cm). Courtesy Alexander Gray Assoc., NY | ©2015 Jack Tworkov/Licensed by VAGA, NY, NY.

“Jack Tworkov: Mark and Grid, 1931–1982” is the gallery’s first exhibition of Tworkov since recently becoming the representative of the artist’s estate. Ambitious, and with an eye for providing an overview, it examines Tworkov’s stylistic progression by featuring works from different decades. However, this exhibition also highlights Tworkov’s conceptual approach during later years by presenting a selection of paintings from the 1960s and 1970s.

Through Oct. 24 at Alexander Gray Associates (510 W. 26th St. btw. 10th & 11th Aves.). Hours: Tues.–Sat. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Call 212-399-2636 or visit alexandergray.com.

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