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Meet the woodchucks of Groundhog Day 2016, starring Punxsutawney Phil

While Valentine's Day usually gets most of the attention in the beginning of the year, let's not forget about Groundhog Day.

The National Centers for Environmental Information reports that the holiday's origin is rooted in an ancient celebration of the halfway point between the winter solstice and spring equinox. The superstition implies that on this day, sunny skies indicate a cold, blustery winter and cloudy skies signify warmer weather in the near future.

Famous woodchucks such as Staten Island Chuck and Punxsutawney Phil are acknowledged every year for numerous decades, however, the lifespan of a groundhog is usually six to eight years.

Scroll down to see some of the best "whistle pigs" around and find out some interesting facts about the furry friends we care about once a year.

Staten Island Chuck

This will be Chuck's 34th year forecasting on
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Andrew Burton

This will be Chuck's 34th year forecasting on Groundhog Day from the Staten Island Zoo, with an 82 percent accuracy rate, according to SI Live. Fun fact: Chuck weighs 8.5 pounds and, like all woodchucks, he is a vegetarian.

Punxsutawney Phil

This year Punxsutawney Phil celebrates his 130th prediction
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Alex Wong

This year Punxsutawney Phil celebrates his 130th prediction as he leaves his burrow on Gobbler's Knob in front of thousands of spectators. In this photo, he climbs on the shoulder of groundhog co-handler John Griffiths after Phil didn't see his shadow, predicting an early spring during the 127th Groundhog Day Celebration at Gobbler's Knob on Feb. 2, 2013 in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania, the center of the Groundhog Day tradition. While Phil is highly regarded as the most famous groundhog, DNAinfo reveals that Staten Island Chuck is far more accurate in his forecasts.

Holtsville Hal

Holtsville Hal handler Greg Drossel shows off the
Photo Credit: James Carbone

Holtsville Hal handler Greg Drossel shows off the town meteorologist at the Holtsville Ecology Center Sunday on Feb. 2, 2014, in Holtsville. Fun fact: National Geographic reveals that groundhogs are considered "true hibernators" from late fall until early spring. They reduce their body temperature and heart rate dramatically during the hibernation season.

Malverne Mel

Malverne Mel, with Mayor Patti McDonald and caretaker
Photo Credit: Sue Grieco

Malverne Mel, with Mayor Patti McDonald and caretaker Andre Ricaud, is the groundhog designated to signal an early or late spring at a ceremony in Malverne on Feb. 2, 2016. Fun fact: Groundhogs are excellent builders. According to National Geographic, their burrows can be anywhere from 8 to 66 feet long with numerous exits and chambers.

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