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New species for 2014

A carnivorous mammal, a see-through snail and a microbe that can withstand even the most thorough cleanings are among this year's top 10 new species identified by the SUNY-ESF International Institute for Species Exploration, announced in honor of 18th century botanist Carolus Linnaeus's May 23 birthday. Check 'em all out below.

(Spoiler alert: They're all awesome. #Science)

Olinguito

The olinguito lives in the Andes mountains in
Photo Credit: Mark Gurney / CC BY 3.0

The olinguito lives in the Andes mountains in Colombia and Ecuador and is part of the same family as the raccoon. It is the first new carnivorous mammal described in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years. Pretty impressive resume.

Skeleton Shrimp

This tiny shrimp was found in sunny Santa
Photo Credit: SINC (Servicio de Informacion y Noticias CientÌficas) and J.M. Guerra-García

This tiny shrimp was found in sunny Santa Catalina, off the coast of Southern California. It's distantly related to the cocktail shrimp you ate at that wedding last weekend.

Leaf-tailed Gecko

This gecko blends into its surroundings as it
Photo Credit: Conrad Hoskin

This gecko blends into its surroundings as it waits for its prey in the rain forests and rocks of Australia. Keep an eye out if you ever find yourself in an isolated area of the Melville Range.

Tinkerbell Fairyfly

Tinkerbell Fairyfly? Amazing name. This insect measures just
Photo Credit: Jennifer Read

Tinkerbell Fairyfly? Amazing name. This insect measures just 0.00984 inches and was found in Costa Rica. Despite its lovely name, tinks likely only has a lifespan of a few days and attacks the eggs of other insects.

Domed Land Snail

Who needs eyes or shell pigment when you
Photo Credit: Jana Bedek

Who needs eyes or shell pigment when you live in complete darkness? Only one living specimen of this very slow, ghost-like snail was found in a cavern in Croatia.

ANDRILL Anemone

This little guy lives under a glacier on
Photo Credit: SCINI; Courtesy of Marymegan Daly

This little guy lives under a glacier on the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica, discovered by the Antarctic Geological Drilling Program (ANDRILL). It is the first species of sea anemone reported to live in ice.

Kaweesak's Dragon Tree

How did the Kaweesak's Dragon Tree go unnoticed
Photo Credit: Paul Wilkin

How did the Kaweesak's Dragon Tree go unnoticed this long? It was discovered in Thailand, growing on limestone -- which may contribute to its low number, as limestone is extracted in the region for manufacturing concrete.

Orange Penicillium

This brightly-colored fungus, found in Tunisia, was named
Photo Credit: Courtesy of Cobus M. Visagie

This brightly-colored fungus, found in Tunisia, was named as a tribute to the Dutch royal family, specifically His Royal Highness the Prince of Orange. Not everyone can say he has a fungus named after him.

Amoeboid Protist

This carnivorous species, found in an underwater cave
Photo Credit: Courtesy of Manuel Maldonado

This carnivorous species, found in an underwater cave off of Spain, is a lot tougher than it looks at first glance. Its size of four or five centimeters makes it a giant in the world of single-celled organisms. It gathers sponge fragments and uses them to construct a shell, then extends its pseudopods to feast on invertebrates.

Clean Room Microbes

OK, so this species might not look exciting.
Photo Credit: Leibniz-Institute DSMZ and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

OK, so this species might not look exciting. But listen to this: These microbes were found on floors of two separate, sterilized rooms where spacecraft are assembled about 2,500 miles apart (one in Florida and one in French Guiana). This microbial species could potentially contaminate other planets!

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