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NYC secures $84.4M in state aid to fund development projects in Brooklyn, Harlem and beyond

A total of $763 million was awarded to more than 1,000 projects across the state in an effort to spur job creation.

A $3.5 million state grant will go toward

A $3.5 million state grant will go toward construction of a new building for the Studio Museum in Harlem, seen in 2016. Photo Credit: Anthony Lanzilote

New York City was a big winner on Tuesday in Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s annual competition for state business aid, securing $84.4 million for building projects, company expansions and worker training in 2018-19.

This year’s award, which consists of grants and state tax credits, will be spread over 137 projects.

The largest award, $3.5 million, will go toward construction of a new building for the Studio Museum in Harlem. The project, valued at $133 million, will include a gallery, space for artist professional development and public space for community activities. About 30 people work at the museum.

Another large award, $2.5 million, will fund the expansion of Nanotronics in the Brooklyn Navy Yard. The company makes microscopes that use artificial intelligence and robotics to detect flaws in production processes in factories. The $11.4 million expansion will add 190 jobs to Nanontronics’ payroll of 34.

“This money is critical to New York City and will help people in the boroughs as well as Manhattan,” Winston Fisher, co-vice chairman of the New York City Regional Economic Development Council and partner in the real estate development firm Fisher Brothers, said in an interview. “This represents economic opportunity in the neighborhoods.”

The city development council was among five councils to be named big winners; the others are the Finger Lakes/Rochester, Syracuse, Utica/Mohawk Valley and Hudson Valley.

A total of $763 million was awarded to more than 1,000 projects across the state.

Cuomo established the councils in 2011 to bring together business executives, union leaders, university presidents and nonprofit officials to develop job creation plans and seek state funding for their implementation.

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