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Mets players whose numbers should also be retired someday

In 55 seasons, the Mets have won two World Series championships, but retired the uniform number of just one player.

But 28 years after honoring Tom Seaver as the first Mets player to have his number retired, Mike Piazza will become the second on Saturday in a pregame ceremony to honor the newly-enshrined Hall of Famer. In addition to Seaver’s No. 41, Piazza’s No. 31 joins former managers Gil Hodges (14) and Casey Stengel (37).

It’s fair to say the Mets have been more selective of which players receive the retired number treatment than the crosstown rival Yankees. It’s also worth mentioning the impressive history of Hall of Fame careers that played out while wearing pinstripes in the Bronx.

Still, some Mets seem to have slipped through the cracks. Not to take anything away from Piazza’s big weekend, but here are a few other Mets greats — both active and retired — who merit some consideration to have their numbers officially removed from circulation and featured above the upper deck at Citi Field. (Uniform number in parentheses)

David Wright (5)

Wright is a no-brainer once he hangs up
Photo Credit: Jim McIsaac

Wright is a no-brainer once he hangs up his spikes. He's the all-time franchise leader in hits and RBIs, and he showed the franchise loyalty by re-signing a lengthy -- and lucrative -- contract in 2012.

Jose Reyes (7)

A four-time All-Star as a Met, Reyes is
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Eric Espada

A four-time All-Star as a Met, Reyes is a possibility even if he can't turn his career and reputation around during his second stint in Queens. He's the franchise leader in stolen bases by nearly 100.

Carlos Beltran (15)

The current Yankee may get the same treatment
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Chris Trotman

The current Yankee may get the same treatment as Piazza. If Beltran enters Cooperstown someday, he very well might be wearing a Mets cap on his plaque. Five of his nine All-Star honors came with the franchise.

Dwight Gooden (16)

The 1985 NL Cy Young Award winner was
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Scott Halleran

The 1985 NL Cy Young Award winner was electric in his prime for the Mets. Although substance abuse issues derailed Gooden's career prematurely, most of his 11-year stay featured Doc befuddling hitters with his heater and curve.

Darryl Strawberry (18)

Nobody bashed more home runs for the Mets,
Photo Credit: Newsday/Paul Bereswill

Nobody bashed more home runs for the Mets, and only Wright and Piazza have matched his seven All-Star appearances by a Mets position player. If not for an up-and-down relationship with the franchise, Straw should have been honored by now.

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