LATEST PAPER
76° Good Afternoon
76° Good Afternoon
Things to Do

Fhitting Room trainer Troy Brooks shares 5 exercises you can do in a park

It’s peak season for free outdoor workouts in New York City. But that doesn’t mean you have to throw in the towel once the weather starts to cool.

Troy Brooks knows a thing or two about outdoor workouts. The Fhitting Room trainer will lead the last free workout in the Meatpacking District’s Sweat Sessions fitness series at Hudson River Park on Aug. 29.

He shares five movements to incorporate into your workouts that are designed to help you move better — on, or off, the grass.

“Rotational and anti-rotational movements are often neglected in many fitness programs; however, these movements offer numerous functional benefits,” Brooks said. “Rotational movements increase flexibility and mobility, while anti-rotational movements help to increase the body’s core strength [and] ability to stabilize and engage during sudden impact.”

Brooks recommends doing each movement for 45 seconds, followed by 30 seconds of rest, for three sets, while those looking for more of a challenge can do each move for 1 minute, followed by 15 seconds of rest, for four sets.

ANTI-ROTATIONAL MOVEMENT: Plank-up

Trainer Troy Brooks has shared five workouts you
Photo Credit: David Handschuh/NYLJ

What to do: “Using your upper body and core, push from a low plank position to a high plank position while keeping the hips squared up to counteract the body’s natural desire to rotate.”
Why do it: “This position will strengthen your core and upper body.”

ANTI-ROTATIONAL MOVEMENT: Plank shoulder taps

Trainer Troy Brooks has shared five workouts you
Photo Credit: David Handschuh/NYLJ

What to do: “Maintain a high plank position with your hips and shoulders parallel to the ground and your wrist positioned right underneath your shoulder blades. Then lift one hand off the ground to tap the opposite shoulder, and return it back to its original place. Repeat this motion using your other hand.”
Why do it: “This position creates less stability causing your body to fight rotation since it naturally wants to rotate your hips. Therefore, your core must work overtime to stop the rotation.”

ANTI-ROTATIONAL MOVEMENT: Panther reach

Trainer Troy Brooks has shared five workouts you
Photo Credit: David Handschuh/NYLJ


What to do: “For this exercise think primal. Begin in a quadruped position (on all fours). Make sure your wrists are stacked underneath your shoulders, with your shoulders parallel to your hips (flat back), and your knees underneath your hips. Once in position, reach out with one arm while simultaneously extending the opposite leg and bending your knee at a 90-degree angle.” (Do on both sides.)
Why do it: “This exercise also makes your body unstable causing you to use internal stabilizer muscles to keep your hips and shoulders square resulting in an amazing full-body workout.”

ROTATIONAL MOVEMENT: Push-up with T rotation

Trainer Troy Brooks has shared five workouts you
Photo Credit: David Handschuh/NYLJ

What to do: “Starting in a push-up position, let your body descend to the ground with about 3 inches of separation from your chest and the ground. Then ascend back to push-up position and rotate your hips open. Allow one of your hands to leave the ground and stretch it toward the sky creating a rotating ‘T’ position.” (Do on both sides.)
Why do it: “This exercise is great for spinal flexibility and upper body strength.”

ROTATIONAL MOVEMENT: High knee pull to rotational lunge

Trainer Troy Brooks has shared five workouts you
Photo Credit: David Handschuh/NYLJ

What to do: “Begin by standing with feet hip-width apart. Drive one knee up, hugging it into your chest while maintaining a neutral spine. This position allows your hip to open and stretch the glute of that leg."

High knee pull to rotational lunge, continued

Trainer Troy Brooks has shared five workouts you
Photo Credit: David Handschuh/NYLJ

"Then immediately release the leg and descend into a forward lunge. Rotate over the leg in the lunge position.” (Do on both sides.)
Why do it: “This warmup allows for great rotation.”

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

Things to Do Photos & Videos