600 subway riders evacuated after smoke reported in tunnel: FDNY


The source of the smoke inside a tunnel near Brooklyn's High Street station, and further details on the stalled C train's issues were not immediately clear. Photo Credit: Craig Ruttle

A C train was stuck near Brooklyn’s High Street station Sunday after “a mechanical problem,” according to the MTA.

<br /> The source of the smoke inside a tunnel near Brooklyn’s High Street station, and further details on the stalled C train’s issues were not immediately clear.” class=”wp-image-136061522″/><figcaption><br /> The source of the smoke inside a tunnel near Brooklyn’s High Street station, and further details on the stalled C train’s issues were not immediately clear. Photo Credit: Danielle Silverman </figcaption></figure>
  	
                                                                                                                  								
				<p>About 600 commuters on a C train were evacuated from Brooklyn’s High Street station Sunday after a train was stuck in the nearby tunnel with mechanical failures, according to the MTA.</p>
			
												
				<p>The train was heading into Manhattan at around 10:19 a.m. when a vital piece of equipment detached, causing the emergency brake to activate and halt the train between High Street and Fulton Street stations, MTA spokesman Tim Minton said in a statement.</p>
			
												
				<p>The breakdown completely derailed A and C service into the afternoon and sent firefighters rushing into the station in response to smoke that billowed through the tunnel — a result of "some sparking" that occurred during the breaking process, Minton said. </p>
			
												
				<p>Commuters on board were ushered onto a rescue train that shuttled them back to High Street. The transit authority momentarily cut power to the tracks around 12:30 p.m. to remove the troubled train from its location. A and C trains were forced to hold in stations in Brooklyn and Queens at that point and, after a series of reroutings and delays, normal service was restored by 1:06 p.m.</p>
			
																	
				<p>The MTA determined that a current collector on the train — a part that connects train cars to the electrified third rail, also known as a "shoe" — had fallen off. Ultimately 19 trains were delayed and another 45 experienced service changes, with impacts rippling across seven lines, according to an internal incident report obtained by amNewYork.</p>
			
												
				<p>"The cause of its detached shoe is under investigation," Minton said. "Crews inspected the track area for defects, finding none. A test train subsequently operated through the same tunnel completing its run without encountering obstructions."</p>
			
												
				<p>The line is served by the oldest trains still in service: the R32s. The model first started rolling on the city’s rails 55 years ago and frequently breaks down. But Sunday’s incident involved a newer R179 train model.</p>
			
					
    
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Vincent Barone