The Jewish High Holidays are upon us. And like most religious holidays, food plays a central role.

“Food is huge,” said Danya Shults, 32, who founded the Jewish lifestyle brand Arq earlier this year.

This year, the two-day celebration of Rosh Hashanah, or the Jewish New Year, kicks off Sept. 20, while Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, is observed Sept. 29-30, and is marked by a 25-hour fast.

For both, time is often spent in a synagogue praying. But for a younger generation that “picks and chooses” their practice, they might go to a Jewish foodie event if they’re not visiting family for the holidays, Shults said.

Arq’s food content is one of the most popular sections of the site, which explores ways for young people — Jewish or not — to connect with the faith. In New York City, that can translate into a meal at any number of Jewish restaurants and delis.

“There are all these amazing High Holiday menus ... but anyone can go,” said Shults, who before launching Arq ran Pop-Up Shabbat, a pop-up restaurant inspired by Jewish culture. “Food is definitely a big way for younger generations to connect.”

Here’s where to make your New Year's reservation: 

Eli’s Table

The restaurant, part of the Eli Zabar empire, has signatures like brisket and gefilte fish a la carte for the month. Or get a three-course meal ($65/person) on Sept. 20 and 21. Call for reservations; 1413 Third Ave., 212-717-9798, elizabar.com

Katz’s Delicatessen

Fill up a la carte on the iconic deli’s brisket, gefilte fish, babka and more, or choose a four-course dinner with your choice of appetizers, meats and sweets ($32.24/person). Now through Oct. 1; 205 E. Houston St., 212-254-2246, katzsdelicatessen.com

Mile End

Bring the gang for a family-style dinner of the Montreal-style Jewish cuisine on Sept. 20 and 21 ($75/person, $35/under 12). The apple-heavy meal includes shaved apple salad, cider-glazed brisket with roasted apples, and apple and honey pudding cake. Call for reservations; 53 Bond St., 646-494-9508, mileenddeli.com