LATEST PAPER
59° Good Afternoon
59° Good Afternoon
Entertainment

Oscars 2016: Acceptance speech favorites, including a global warming plea from Leonardo DiCaprio

Chris Rock stole the show, of course, with a biting opening monologue that set the tone of his hosting gig that repeatedly addressed the diversity issues dogging the Academy Awards from the moment the nominees were announced until the start of the Oscars 2016 ceremony.

But the winners, from best director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu to best actress Brie Larson, had their 45 seconds, and utilized them to promote everything from independent cinema to a hope for a day when skin color will barely cause a ripple.

And the notable acceptance speeches are:

Alejandro Inarritu, best directing, 'The Revenant'

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, in accepting his best-directing Oscar,
Photo Credit: EPA / Aaron Poole

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, in accepting his best-directing Oscar, for "The Revenant," included a nod to the diversity theme that ran throughout the awards -- thanks, in no small part, to the host, comedian Chris Rock. In talking about his film, Inarritu said, "I, very lucky to be here tonight, OK, but unfortunately, many others haven't had the same luck. There is a line in the film that says, Glass to his mixed-race son, 'They don't listen to you, they just see the color of your skin.' So what a great opportunity to our generation to really liberate ourselves from all prejudice and, you know, this tribal thinking, and make sure for once and forever that the color of the skin become as irrelevant as the length of our hair."

Cast and crew of 'Spotlight,' best picture

Producer Michael Sugar dived in with a note
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Producer Michael Sugar dived in with a note to the victims at the center of his film about the reporting on the decades of priest molestation in Boston. "This film gave a voice to survivors, and this Oscar amplifies that voice which we hope will become a choir that will resonate all the way to the Vatican. Pope Francis, it's time to protect the children and restore the faith," Sugar said.

Producer Blye Pagon Gaust followed, and added, "We would not be here today without the heroic efforts of our reporters. Not only do they effect global change, but they absolutely show us the necessity for investigative journalism."

Leonardo DiCaprio, actor in a leading role, 'The Revenant'

It was his fourth nomination, including a recent
Photo Credit: EPA / Aaron Poole

It was his fourth nomination, including a recent nod for "The Wolf of Wall Street," and the fourth time was the charm, with Leonardo DiCaprio surprising few with his win for his star turn in "The Revenant." He provided a political jolt during his acceptance speech with the insertion of one of his favorite causes: the Earth and climate change. "Our production [of "The Revenant"] needed to move to the southern tip of this planet just to be able to find snow. Climate change is real. It is happening right now. It is the most urgent threat facing our entire species, and we need to work collectively together and stop procrastinating. We need to support leaders around the world who do not speak for the big polluters or the big corporations, but who speak for all of humanity, for the indigenous people of the world, for the billions and billions of underprivileged people who will be most affected by this, for our children's children, and for those people out there whose voices have been drowned out by the politics of greed."

Ennio Morricone, original score, 'The Hateful Eight'

Clutching a piece of paper and reading his
Photo Credit: EPA / Aaron Poole

Clutching a piece of paper and reading his speech in Italian as a companion translated, composer Morricone, who also scored "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly," finally nabbed an Oscar after six nominations. It may have been as emotional for him as it was for longtime fans as he thanked the academy "for this prestigious acknowledgment" and gave a shout-out to fellow nominee, "the esteemed" John Williams.

"There isn't a great soundtrack without a great movie that inspires it. I want to thank Quentin Tarantino for having chosen me, Harvey Weinstein and the entire team who made this extraordinary film. I dedicate this award to my wife, Maria, who is there watching me."

Brie Larson, actress in a leading role, 'Room'

Larson, whose little-film-that-could surprised many with both its
Photo Credit: EPA / Aaron Poole

Larson, whose little-film-that-could surprised many with both its intensity and staying power, started her speech with gratitude for venues for independent filmmaking.

"I want to start big because the thing that I love about movie making is how many people it takes to make it, so I want to start first with the Telluride Film Festival, the Toronto Film Festival, who gave us a chance, who gave us a platform first."

Sam Smith, best original song, 'Writing's on the Wall'

Smith, right, who shared the award with Jimmy
Photo Credit: AMPAS

Smith, right, who shared the award with Jimmy Napes, could have started his own hashtag, #OscarsSoStraight.

Instead, wearing a classic tux and a huge smile, accepted the Oscar for the theme song for "Spectre," the latest Bond film, "I read an article a few months ago by Sir Ian McKellen and he said that no openly gay man had ever won an Oscar, and, if this is the case, even if it isn't the case, I want to dedicate this to the LGBT community all around the world. I stand here, I stand here tonight as a proud gay man, and I hope we can all stand together as equals one day."

Mark Rylance, actor in a supporting role, 'Bridge of Spies'

Rylance was humble in his acceptance speech, praising

Rylance was humble in his acceptance speech, praising "one of the greatest storytellers of our time," the "Bridge of Spies" director Steven Spielberg, and other nominees in the supporting actor category.

"I want to just say thank you to my fellow nominees. I don't know how they separate my acting from your glorious acting in these wonderful films that you're in, which everyone must see. I don't know how they separated the five of us from all the other supporting actors who are making films at the moment. It's a wonderful time to be an actor and I'm proud to be part of it."

Alicia Vikander, actress in a supporting role, 'The Danish Girl'

Vikander's speech wasn't notable so much for what
Photo Credit: EPA / Mark Suban

Vikander's speech wasn't notable so much for what she said, but how she said it -- and to whom. She was the favorite to win best supporting actress, but she appeared emotional as she looked over the audience for director Tom Hooper. "Where are you, my director?" she said. "Thank you so much for your support and belief in me. "

The camera quickly found her co-star Eddie Redmayne as she continued: "And Eddie, there you are. Thank you for being the best acting partner. I couldn't have done it without you. You raised my game."

Jonas Rivera and Pete Docter, 'Inside Out,' best animated feature

The most heartfelt speeches often come from the
Photo Credit: EPA / Aaron Poole

The most heartfelt speeches often come from the folks who aren't generally in front of the camera. In accepting their award for best animated film, Rivera and Docter gave a sweet speech filled with love of their craft and the next generation.

"This film was really born from watching our kids grow up, which is not easy. Anyone out there who's in junior high, high school, working it out, suffering. There are days you're gonna feel sad, you're gonna feel angry, you're gonna be scared. That's nothing you can choose, but you can make stuff. Make films. Draw. Write. It'll make a world of difference."

Jenny Beavan, best costume design, 'Mad Max: Fury Road'

After thanking the
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

After thanking the "amazing" crew and others involved with "Mad Max: Fury Road," costume designer Beavan's speech turned even more outward: "I just want to say one quite serious thing. I've been thinking about this a lot, but actually it could be horribly prophetic, 'Mad Max,' if we're not kinder to each other and if we don't stop polluting our atmosphere, so you know, it could happen."

Laszlo Nemes, best foreign language film, 'Son of Saul'

Nemes, in speaking about
Photo Credit: AFP / Getty Images / Mark Ralston

Nemes, in speaking about "Son of Saul," thanked Hungary for funding his film about the Holocaust before touching on what it meant for him.

"You know, even in the darkest hours of mankind, when in the darkest hours of mankind, there might be a voice within us, that allows us to remain human. That's the hope of this film."

Comments

We're revamping our Comments section. Learn more and share your input.

Entertainment photos & videos