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SNL: Paris Hilton, Robert De Niro and more of the show's worst hosts

It's easy to remember the best hosts of "Saturday Night Live," from Tom Hanks, Justin Timberlake to John Goodman.

But thinking back to those that made viewers cringe or sometimes drove cast members mad takes a little more work. (There are just some things in entertainment that we'd just rather all forget.)

But as SNL begins its amazing 41st season on Saturday, let's jog your memory with some of the worst and most controversial hosts in the show's storied history.

Andrew Dice Clay (May 12, 1990)

In 1990, the brash comedian's popularity was peaking,
Photo Credit: Matt Hoyle

In 1990, the brash comedian's popularity was peaking, as was the hostility sent his way for his often misogynist humor -- so much so that cast member Nora Dunn refused to appear on the episode and singer Sinead O Connor (who later had her own SNL controversy when she tore up a photo of the pope) canceled.

Robert De Niro (hosted three times)

Just because you're one of the best actors
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Just because you're one of the best actors of a generation, doesn't mean you can do live comedy. Obviously the guy can be funny ("Meet The Parents," "Midnight Run," for example), but put him in front of a camera and some cue cards and there's usually one result: Awkwardness

George Steinbrenner (Oct. 20, 1990)

Somebody thought this would be a good idea.
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Eliot J. Schechter

Somebody thought this would be a good idea. Steinbrenner's monologue was surprisingly well delivered, as he stressed that he wasn't an entertainer, explaining that he wouldn't sing old Judy Garland songs or "catch a bullet in my teeth ... I hope." Despite the laughs he got there, if you remember this episode, you will agree, George was no entertainer.

Chevy Chase (hosted eight times)

Wait, he hosted eight times, was an original
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Wait, he hosted eight times, was an original cast-member and yet he's made our "worst hosts" list? How can this be? According to "Live From New York: The Complete, Uncensored History of Saturday Night Live" by Tom Shales and James Miller, Chase was a nightmare to work with when he returned to host, particularly for the Nov. 16, 1985 episode. Besides being outright rude to the new cast, Chase pitched an offensive sketch starring gay cast member Terry Sweeney as an AIDS victim having his weight loss evaluated by his doctor. "He has no qualms telling you you're idiot," cast member Tim Meadows said in "Live From New York."

Paris Hilton (Sept. 5, 2005)

Paris Hilton was the Kim Kardashian of the
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Paris Hilton was the Kim Kardashian of the 2000s - famous for being famous, no talent necessary. And that void was on full display when she took the stage at 30 Rock. Tina Fey later told Howard Stern on his Sirius show that Hilton "is a piece of [expletive]." She said people were thinking "maybe she'd be fun ... she won't take herself so seriously. She took herself super seriously. She's so dumb and so proud of how dumb she is," Fey said. Whoa, calm down Tina! She also added that Hilton refused to perform a sketch pitched to her about her sex tape, locked herself in her dressing room and just wanted to make fun of people she hated, like Jessica Simpson.

Milton Berle (Apr. 14, 1979)

Mr. Television apparently wasn't very well suited for
Photo Credit: Getty Images / Kevin Winter

Mr. Television apparently wasn't very well suited for live, late-night TV. Berle reportedly raised the ire of SNL producer Lorne Michaels by mugging for the camera, upstaging cast members and ad-libbing. The story goes that was he was downright offensive to the cast-members, showed off his -- how do we put it? -- famous body part, and filled the crowd with his friends and family. He was reportedly banned from the show after the debacle.

Steven Seagal (Apr. 20, 1991)

Biggest
Photo Credit: Getty Images

Biggest "jerk to ever be on the show"? "That would be Steven Seagal," joked Lorne Michaels in a 1993 sketch with Nicholas Cage.

According to "Live From New York," Seagal pitched ideas that were "so heinous, so hilariously awful, we felt like we were on 'Candid Camera,'" said cast member Julia Sweeney. "He didn't realize that you can't tell somebody they're stupid on Wednesday and expect them to continue writing for you on Saturday," Tim Meadows said of Seagal in the book.

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