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Trump protesters gather in NYC to make signs ahead of Inauguration Day

You won't find many upbeat Inauguration Day watch parties in New York City this year, but you will find plenty of gatherings of protesters, including the artistically inclined.

Sign-making parties and events have popped up around the city to accompany the protests that are expected to fill the streets here and a few hours south in Washington, D.C., where many New Yorkers will travel to protest the inauguration of Donald Trump.

Illustrator Jen Mussari, 28, was planning to work on her own sign at Small City, a Gowanus co-working space, when she and friends decided to open the event to anyone and post it on Facebook.

"While we’re all freelancers, we have friends who have full-time jobs in the city who like to come to things like this -- so we wanted to open this up to them as well," she said.

Like many New Yorkers, those at the event were deeply disappointed at the outcome of the election. And like many protesters, they seemed to be concerned about what a Trump presidency will mean for women. Mussari will head to Washington and plans to bring along a sign that reads: "Girl just want to have FUN-damental human rights."

She said the election has spurred a sense of community among like-minded women, recalling a gathering she attended shortly after Trump won.

"It was a women’s group meeting, and it just turned into a support group," she said. "We needed that."

Here's a look at some of the other signs that were in the works at the Gowanus event.

Phrases for posters

Anyone in need of inspiration could find it
Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

Anyone in need of inspiration could find it in a list of potential phrases for signs. If you're still planning on making one, Mussari had advice.

"I think it has to be legible, both in style and messaging. So for me, the best protest sign is white and black, black and white -- whether it's white on black or black on white," she said. "And I'd say less than 15 words. The fewer words, the more effective."

Art supplies to share

Mussari and her colleagues set out art supplies
Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

Mussari and her colleagues set out art supplies ranging from markers to paint for those who are a little more brave.

Artists at work

Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

"It seems like the important thing to do," Frances MacLeod, 26, of Brooklyn, said of the protests, "to go where the other women are and be supportive."

Granola bars for freedom

MacLeod also made this tote bag, which she
Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

MacLeod also made this tote bag, which she plans to stock full of snacks for hungry marchers. "I ordered a bunch of granola bars from Amazon," she said.

A finished sign

MacLeod's sign took inspiration from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's
Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

MacLeod's sign took inspiration from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's book, "We Should All Be Feminists."

"It's really good and it encompasses feminism from a global perspective, which I really appreciated and I think is a valuable perspective for us," MacLeod said.

Painting posters

Erin Rommel, 33, of Brooklyn, and Patricia Raubo,
Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

Erin Rommel, 33, of Brooklyn, and Patricia Raubo, 29, of Brooklyn, worked on signs at the other end of the table.

Pussycats were a common theme

This angry cat was part of Rommel's sign.
Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

This angry cat was part of Rommel's sign.

"Almost everyone I know is going to one of the marches," she said. "So I was like, 'We might as well do this and get the energy going.'"

A work in progress

The full sign, when finished, will read:
Photo Credit: Jillian Jorgensen

The full sign, when finished, will read: "Not up for grabs," a reference to Trump's lewd comments about grabbing women.

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