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Titanic in NYC: Places with ties to the ill-fated ship

On April 15, 1912, the RMS Titanic sank to the bottom of the Atlantic, killing more than 1,500 of its passengers and crew.

If it hadn’t collided with an iceberg, the ship would have completed its maiden voyage right here in New York City.

The surviving passengers and crew were brought to the city after being rescued from the sea, and prominent New Yorkers who perished on the ship were memorialized in many ways.

To mark the 105th anniversary of the Titanic’s sinking, amNewYork took a look at some of the places to memorialize the Titanic in New York City.

Straus Park memorial

A triangular plot of green space where Broadway
Photo Credit: Christa Lopez

A triangular plot of green space where Broadway and West End Avenue meet at 106th Street honors the lives of Isidor Straus and his wife Ida, both of whom died on the Titanic. Isidor Straus was the co-owner of Macy's and a prominent figure in New York City at the time the Titanic sank. According to the New York City parks department blog, the Daily Plant, when news spread that the Titanic was sinking and crews began filling lifeboats with women and children, Ida Straus declined a spot on a lifeboat, choosing to stay with her husband instead. The park includes a monument and floral bed (that was once a reflecting pool) dedicated to the Strauses.

Titanic Memorial at South Street Seaport

One of the most well-known Titanic memorials in
Photo Credit: Christa Lopez

One of the most well-known Titanic memorials in the city, Titanic Memorial Park at the entrance to the South Street Seaport features a lighthouse at its center. The lighthouse, however, isn't so much an actual lighthouse as it is a memorial statue. In 1913, exactly one year after the Titanic sank, the lighthouse was placed at the top of the Seamen's Church Institute in Lower Manhattan. After it was donated to the South Street Seaport Museum in 1967, the Titanic Memorial Lighthouse was put back on display for the public in 1976, according to the parks department blog, the Daily Plant.

Pier 54: Former Cunard-White Star Line pier

To the untrained eye, Pier 54 is nothing
Photo Credit: <a href="http://bit.ly/1WJ6DFY" target="_blank">Kim Carpenter via Flickr</a>

To the untrained eye, Pier 54 is nothing but an empty, unused pier with a rusty old sign. But there is actually much more history there: If you look closely you can see it was once the Cunard-White Star pier where the survivors of the Titanic disembarked from the RMS Carpathia.

William T. Stead Memorial at Central Park

If you walk along Fifth Avenue to 91st
Photo Credit: Christa Lopez

If you walk along Fifth Avenue to 91st Street, you will find a memorial to William T. Stead, a British journalist who died on the Titanic. The bronze bas-relief is set into the wall that separates Fifth Avenue from Central Park. According to the parks department, Stead died while helping others aboard the sinking ship. The memorial is a copy of the original by British sculptor George James Frampton, which is set into a wall on London's Embankment promenade on the Thames River.

Jane Hotel

After survivors disembarked from the RMS Carpathia, many
Photo Credit: Christa Lopez

After survivors disembarked from the RMS Carpathia, many were put up at the American Seamen's Friend Society Sailors' Home and Institute -- now the Jane Hotel -- until the American investigation into the Titanic's sinking was completed. Currently, the Jane Hotel, at 113 Jane St. in the West Village, bills itself as a place where guests can "live as the locals do." According to the hotel's website, the surviving crew from the Titanic held a memorial there four days after the ship sank.

Stained-glass memorial at Cathedral of St. John the Divine

Inside the historic Cathedral of St. John the
Photo Credit: Archives of the Cathedral of St. John the Divine

Inside the historic Cathedral of St. John the Divine at 1047 Amsterdam Ave., you will find a hauntingly beautiful stained-glass memorial depicting the sinking of the Titanic. The window is featured in the cathedral's American History Bay and was designed by Ernest W. Wakeman in 1925. It was donated by the family of John Jacob Astor, who died in the sinking of the Titanic.

Green-Wood cemetery

Green-Wood cemetery is a resting place for
Photo Credit: Polly Higgins

Green-Wood cemetery is a resting place for several of the Titanic's survivors and victims, including Wyckoff Van Derhoef, who lived in Brooklyn and died when the ship sank, according to the cemetery's website.

South Street Seaport’s Titanic Walking Tour

For a limited time only, you can take
Photo Credit: Christa Lopez

For a limited time only, you can take a tour of all the sites near the South Street Seaport that are connected to the Titanic. This year's tours are being held on April 14 and 15. The tour begins at 12 p.m. and 3 p.m. each day and lasts for about 75 minutes. For more information, head to Downtown Alliance.

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